Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Trait-mediated apparent competition in an intraguild predator-prey system


Banerji, Aabir; Morin, Peter J (2014). Trait-mediated apparent competition in an intraguild predator-prey system. Oikos, 123(5):567-574.

Abstract

Apparent competition is of broad interest due to its effects on community structure and potential applications in agriculture, restoration, and medicine. It is well-established that apparent competition can result from changes in predator abundance or behavior caused by interactions with alternate prey, but no previous empirical study has demonstrated that apparent competition can also result from prey-induced changes in predator morphology. This trait-mediated alternative mechanism of apparent competition would expand the range of conditions under which apparent competition might occur in nature and identify new ways to generate or modify apparent competition in applied contexts. Here, as a proof of concept, we show that trait-mediated apparent competition can arise from inducible offenses and show how it operates using experiments involving three ciliates. When it feeds on Colpidium kleini, the intraguild predator Tetrahymena vorax increases in size to the extent that it can then consume Paramecium aurelia, an even larger prey. When feeding only on bacteria, however, Tetrahymena remains smaller and is unable to consume Paramecium. This trait-mediated indirect effect leads to the predatory exclusion of Paramecium, while Tetrahymena and Colpidium coexist. Developmental expansions such as those underlying the interactions observed in our study are not limited to ciliates, such as Tetrahymena, but occur among many diverse taxa and may have a surprising degree of influence over the structure and dynamics of food webs.

Abstract

Apparent competition is of broad interest due to its effects on community structure and potential applications in agriculture, restoration, and medicine. It is well-established that apparent competition can result from changes in predator abundance or behavior caused by interactions with alternate prey, but no previous empirical study has demonstrated that apparent competition can also result from prey-induced changes in predator morphology. This trait-mediated alternative mechanism of apparent competition would expand the range of conditions under which apparent competition might occur in nature and identify new ways to generate or modify apparent competition in applied contexts. Here, as a proof of concept, we show that trait-mediated apparent competition can arise from inducible offenses and show how it operates using experiments involving three ciliates. When it feeds on Colpidium kleini, the intraguild predator Tetrahymena vorax increases in size to the extent that it can then consume Paramecium aurelia, an even larger prey. When feeding only on bacteria, however, Tetrahymena remains smaller and is unable to consume Paramecium. This trait-mediated indirect effect leads to the predatory exclusion of Paramecium, while Tetrahymena and Colpidium coexist. Developmental expansions such as those underlying the interactions observed in our study are not limited to ciliates, such as Tetrahymena, but occur among many diverse taxa and may have a surprising degree of influence over the structure and dynamics of food webs.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 22 Jan 2014
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:22 Jan 2014 12:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:23
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0030-1299
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2013.00937.x

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations