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Religion is good, belief is better: religion, religiosity, and substance use among young Swiss men


Gmel, Gerhard; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Dermota, Petra; Gaume, Jacques; Bertholet, Nicolas; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard; Studer, Joseph (2013). Religion is good, belief is better: religion, religiosity, and substance use among young Swiss men. Substance Use & Misuse, 48(12):1085-1098.

Abstract

We examined the influence of religious denomination (RD) and religiosity/spirituality on licit and illicit substance use beyond the potential impact of parental variables. Data from a representative sample of Swiss men (n = 5,387) approximately 20 years old were collected between August 2010 and November 2011. We asked single item questions about RD and religious self-description (RSD) (including aspects of spirituality). Alcohol use, smoking, and illicit drug use was measured as outcome variables. Logistic regressions (adjusting for parenting and socioeconomic background) revealed that religiosity/spirituality was inversely associated with substance use and that it was more strongly associated than denomination. RD, particularly having no denomination, was independently associated with the use of most substances. The study's limitations, and the implications for future work are noted.

Abstract

We examined the influence of religious denomination (RD) and religiosity/spirituality on licit and illicit substance use beyond the potential impact of parental variables. Data from a representative sample of Swiss men (n = 5,387) approximately 20 years old were collected between August 2010 and November 2011. We asked single item questions about RD and religious self-description (RSD) (including aspects of spirituality). Alcohol use, smoking, and illicit drug use was measured as outcome variables. Logistic regressions (adjusting for parenting and socioeconomic background) revealed that religiosity/spirituality was inversely associated with substance use and that it was more strongly associated than denomination. RD, particularly having no denomination, was independently associated with the use of most substances. The study's limitations, and the implications for future work are noted.

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11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:21 Jan 2014 13:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:23
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1082-6084
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/10826084.2013.799017
PubMed ID:24041170

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