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The endovascular occlusion system for safe and immediate peripheral vessel occlusion during vascular interventions


Emmert, Maximilian Y; Venbrux, Anthony; Rudakov, Leon; Cesarovic, Nikola; Radvany, Martin G; Gailloud, Philippe; Falk, Volkmar; Plass, Andre (2013). The endovascular occlusion system for safe and immediate peripheral vessel occlusion during vascular interventions. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 17(5):882-885.

Abstract

Endovascular occlusion of blood vessels is an important part of interventional therapy concepts. Here, we evaluate the feasibility, procedural safety and efficacy of the novel endovascular occlusion system (EOS) in the arterial system in a porcine model. Thirteen devices were deployed in the iliac and femoral arteries (diameter: 4-5 mm) of five adult swine. Post-deployment angiography was performed at 1, 5 and 10 min and 6 h. All devices (n = 13) could be successfully delivered without any complications, such as dissection, perforation or rupture. The devices could be easily advanced to the target vessel segment, deployed at the intended target location and produced immediate and complete vessel occlusion which was confirmed to be maintained after 6 h. No leaks, recanalization or device migration was observed. In this pilot study, we demonstrate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of immediate vessel occlusion with the EOS device in the peripheral arterial system in a porcine animal model. Our data indicate that this novel device allows precise delivery without the occurrence of cardiovascular complications. Owing to its long-term safety and efficacy the EOS may represent a promising and effective alternative to currently available devices for vessel occlusion during vascular interventions.

Abstract

Endovascular occlusion of blood vessels is an important part of interventional therapy concepts. Here, we evaluate the feasibility, procedural safety and efficacy of the novel endovascular occlusion system (EOS) in the arterial system in a porcine model. Thirteen devices were deployed in the iliac and femoral arteries (diameter: 4-5 mm) of five adult swine. Post-deployment angiography was performed at 1, 5 and 10 min and 6 h. All devices (n = 13) could be successfully delivered without any complications, such as dissection, perforation or rupture. The devices could be easily advanced to the target vessel segment, deployed at the intended target location and produced immediate and complete vessel occlusion which was confirmed to be maintained after 6 h. No leaks, recanalization or device migration was observed. In this pilot study, we demonstrate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of immediate vessel occlusion with the EOS device in the peripheral arterial system in a porcine animal model. Our data indicate that this novel device allows precise delivery without the occurrence of cardiovascular complications. Owing to its long-term safety and efficacy the EOS may represent a promising and effective alternative to currently available devices for vessel occlusion during vascular interventions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:9 December 2013
Deposited On:03 Feb 2014 10:10
Last Modified:07 Aug 2017 04:47
Publisher:European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
ISSN:1569-9285
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivt318
PubMed ID:23868605

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