Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Phylogeography of Primula allionii (Primulaceae), a narrow endemic of the Maritime Alps


Casazza, Gabriele; Grassi, Fabrizio; Zecca, Giovanni; Mariotti, Mauro Giorgio; Guerrina, Maria; Minuto, Luigi (2013). Phylogeography of Primula allionii (Primulaceae), a narrow endemic of the Maritime Alps. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 173(4):637-653.

Abstract

Primula allionii is endemic to a tiny area of the Maritime Alps and has one of the narrowest distribution ranges in this hotspot of biodiversity. Phylogeographical patterns in P. allionii were studied using plastid DNA markers and dominantly inherited markers (AFLP and ISSR) to verify any admixture between P. allionii and the sympatric P. marginata and to detect the phylogeographical history of the species. Morphometric measurements of flowers and admixture analysis support the hypothesis that hybridization occurs in nature. Species distribution models using two climate models (CCSM and MIROC) suggested a reduction in habitat suitability during cold periods. Phylogeographical analysis suggested an old allopatric divergence during the mid-Pleistocene transition (about 0.8 Mya) without recolonization/contraction cycles. The Alps watershed does not act as a strong barrier between the two main areas of the distribution range, and moderate gene flow by pollen seems to create the admixture recorded among the stands. According to our results, the persistence of P. allionii throughout the Ice Age appears to be linked to the capacity of the Maritime Alps to provide a wide diversity of microhabitats consistent with the recent biogeographical pattern proposed for the Mediterranean Basin.

Abstract

Primula allionii is endemic to a tiny area of the Maritime Alps and has one of the narrowest distribution ranges in this hotspot of biodiversity. Phylogeographical patterns in P. allionii were studied using plastid DNA markers and dominantly inherited markers (AFLP and ISSR) to verify any admixture between P. allionii and the sympatric P. marginata and to detect the phylogeographical history of the species. Morphometric measurements of flowers and admixture analysis support the hypothesis that hybridization occurs in nature. Species distribution models using two climate models (CCSM and MIROC) suggested a reduction in habitat suitability during cold periods. Phylogeographical analysis suggested an old allopatric divergence during the mid-Pleistocene transition (about 0.8 Mya) without recolonization/contraction cycles. The Alps watershed does not act as a strong barrier between the two main areas of the distribution range, and moderate gene flow by pollen seems to create the admixture recorded among the stands. According to our results, the persistence of P. allionii throughout the Ice Age appears to be linked to the capacity of the Maritime Alps to provide a wide diversity of microhabitats consistent with the recent biogeographical pattern proposed for the Mediterranean Basin.

Statistics

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 24 Jan 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:24 Jan 2014 08:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0024-4074
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/boj.12110

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations