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Comparison of treatment guidance based on bronchial responsivness to mannitol, spirometry or exhaled nitric oxide in stable asthmatic children


Lurà, M P; Inci, D; Jung, A; Knoepfli, B; Wildhaber, J H; Moeller, A (2013). Comparison of treatment guidance based on bronchial responsivness to mannitol, spirometry or exhaled nitric oxide in stable asthmatic children. Open Journal of Pediatrics, 3(4):406-417.

Abstract

Aim: The goal of this study was to compare asthma treatment guidance based on bronchial hyper-responsiveness to mannitol, spirometry or exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in stable asthmatic children. Methods: 60 stable allergic asthmatic children aged 7 to 16 years on a low to medium dose treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) were recruited to a double blind randomised controlled trial. At study entry (visit 1), the following was assessed: FeNO, spirometry, bronchial hyper-responsiveness to mannitol (MDP- test), quality of life (paediatric asthma quality-of-life questionnaire; PAQLQ) and asthma control (asthma control test; ACT). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups and treatment was modified by a blinded respiratory physician according to the test results of visit 1: ICS dose was doubled when FeNO was >22 ppb (group 1), in case of a positive MDP-test (group 2) or when FEV1 was <80% of a predicted one (group 3), respectively, or remained unchanged for the remaining subjects. After 3 months (visit 2), the subjects were reassessed and all tests were repeated. Results: 48 children successfully completed the study. At the first visit, 8 out of 16 (50%) children in group 1 showed a FeNO > 22 ppb, 8 children out of 16 (50%) in group 2 showed a positive MDP-test and 3 children out of 16 (18.7%) in group 3 had a FEV1 < 80% of that predicted and had their ICS-dose doubled. In group 1, FeNO decreased significantly after the intervention (p = 0.005), whereas the self-administered and the interviewer-administered PAQLQ (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.033) as well as the ACT (p = 0.031) increased. Neither the number of children with a positive mannitol challenge nor spirometric results changed significantly. In group 2 and group 3, there were no significant changes in none of the assessed parameters. Conclusion: In this small pragmatic double blind randomised controlled study, we showed that ICS dose modification based on FeNO led to increased quality of life and enhanced asthma control, and to a reduction in airway inflammation and was superior to treatment modifications based on bronchial hyper-responsiveness to mannitol or on FEV1.

Abstract

Aim: The goal of this study was to compare asthma treatment guidance based on bronchial hyper-responsiveness to mannitol, spirometry or exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in stable asthmatic children. Methods: 60 stable allergic asthmatic children aged 7 to 16 years on a low to medium dose treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) were recruited to a double blind randomised controlled trial. At study entry (visit 1), the following was assessed: FeNO, spirometry, bronchial hyper-responsiveness to mannitol (MDP- test), quality of life (paediatric asthma quality-of-life questionnaire; PAQLQ) and asthma control (asthma control test; ACT). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups and treatment was modified by a blinded respiratory physician according to the test results of visit 1: ICS dose was doubled when FeNO was >22 ppb (group 1), in case of a positive MDP-test (group 2) or when FEV1 was <80% of a predicted one (group 3), respectively, or remained unchanged for the remaining subjects. After 3 months (visit 2), the subjects were reassessed and all tests were repeated. Results: 48 children successfully completed the study. At the first visit, 8 out of 16 (50%) children in group 1 showed a FeNO > 22 ppb, 8 children out of 16 (50%) in group 2 showed a positive MDP-test and 3 children out of 16 (18.7%) in group 3 had a FEV1 < 80% of that predicted and had their ICS-dose doubled. In group 1, FeNO decreased significantly after the intervention (p = 0.005), whereas the self-administered and the interviewer-administered PAQLQ (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.033) as well as the ACT (p = 0.031) increased. Neither the number of children with a positive mannitol challenge nor spirometric results changed significantly. In group 2 and group 3, there were no significant changes in none of the assessed parameters. Conclusion: In this small pragmatic double blind randomised controlled study, we showed that ICS dose modification based on FeNO led to increased quality of life and enhanced asthma control, and to a reduction in airway inflammation and was superior to treatment modifications based on bronchial hyper-responsiveness to mannitol or on FEV1.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:28 Jan 2014 08:30
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 19:11
Publisher:Scientific Research Publishing
ISSN:2160-8741
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4236/ojped.2013.34074

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