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Psychosomatics in obstetrics and gynecology – evaluation of a compulsory standardized teaching program


Tschudin, Sibil; Kaplan, Zuzana; Alder, Judith; Huang, Dorothy; Bitzer, Johannes; Leeners, Brigitte (2013). Psychosomatics in obstetrics and gynecology – evaluation of a compulsory standardized teaching program. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, 34(3):108-115.

Abstract

Objective: This observational study was aimed at assessing the effect of case supervision in small groups over a two-year period as part of a standardized psychosomatic basic training for future obstetrician-gynecologists from the physicians’ perspective.
Methods: The supervised groups were evaluated by questionnaires distributed to all 128 candidates at the beginning (T1), at half time (T2) and at the end of the course (T3). Aside from a validated battery of questions on self-efficacy, items included self-estimated psychosomatic competence, professional satisfaction as well as a validation of the training program.
Results: The training program was associated with a significant increase of self-reported psychosomatic competence (55.0/68.9, p = 0.000) and self-efficacy (2.4/2.8, p = 0.0011). While major changes occurred at the end of the first year of the supervised groups, no further enhancement could be demonstrated throughout the second year. A total of 44 (88%) study participants who answered at T3 considered the training program as helpful.
Conclusions: The presented teaching program – more precisely the supervised groups – seemed to be effective in increasing self-estimated psychosomatic competence and self-efficacy in future specialists for obstetrics and gynecology. It may serve as a model for the systematic integration of standardized psychosomatic basic training into the education of obstetrician-gynecologists.

Abstract

Objective: This observational study was aimed at assessing the effect of case supervision in small groups over a two-year period as part of a standardized psychosomatic basic training for future obstetrician-gynecologists from the physicians’ perspective.
Methods: The supervised groups were evaluated by questionnaires distributed to all 128 candidates at the beginning (T1), at half time (T2) and at the end of the course (T3). Aside from a validated battery of questions on self-efficacy, items included self-estimated psychosomatic competence, professional satisfaction as well as a validation of the training program.
Results: The training program was associated with a significant increase of self-reported psychosomatic competence (55.0/68.9, p = 0.000) and self-efficacy (2.4/2.8, p = 0.0011). While major changes occurred at the end of the first year of the supervised groups, no further enhancement could be demonstrated throughout the second year. A total of 44 (88%) study participants who answered at T3 considered the training program as helpful.
Conclusions: The presented teaching program – more precisely the supervised groups – seemed to be effective in increasing self-estimated psychosomatic competence and self-efficacy in future specialists for obstetrics and gynecology. It may serve as a model for the systematic integration of standardized psychosomatic basic training into the education of obstetrician-gynecologists.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reproductive Endocrinology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:21 Jan 2014 12:16
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 08:31
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:0167-482X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/0167482X.2013.829035

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