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Costamere remodeling with muscle loading and unloading in healthy young men


Li, Ruowei; Narici, Marco V; Erskine, Robert M; Seynnes, Olivier R; Rittweger, Jörn; Pišot, Rado; Šimunič, Boštjan; Flück, Martin (2013). Costamere remodeling with muscle loading and unloading in healthy young men. Journal of Anatomy, 223(5):525-536.

Abstract

Costameres are mechano-sensory sites of focal adhesion in the sarcolemma that provide a structural anchor for myofibrils. Their turnover is regulated by integrin-associated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). We hypothesized that changes in content of costamere components (beta 1 integrin, FAK, meta-vinculin, gamma-vinculin) with increased and reduced loading of human anti-gravity muscle would: (i) relate to changes in muscle size and molecular parameters of muscle size regulation [p70S6K, myosin heavy chain (MHC)1 and MHCIIA]; (ii) correspond to adjustments in activity and expression of FAK, and its negative regulator, FRNK; and (iii) reflect the temporal response to reduced and increased loading. Unloading induced a progressive decline in thickness of human vastus lateralis muscle after 8 and 34 days of bedrest (-4% and -14%, respectively; n = 9), contrasting the increase in muscle thickness after 10 and 27 days of resistance training (+5% and +13%; n = 6). Changes in muscle thickness were correlated with changes in cross-sectional area of type I muscle fibers (r = 0.66) and beta 1 integrin content (r = 0.76) at the mid-point of altered loading. Changes in meta-vinculin and FAK-pY397 content were correlated (r = 0.85) and differed, together with the changes of beta 1 integrin, MHCI, MHCII and p70S6K, between the mid- and end-point of resistance training. By contrast, costamere protein level changes did not differ between time points of bedrest. The findings emphasize the role of FAK-regulated costamere turnover in the load-dependent addition and removal of myofibrils, and argue for two phases of muscle remodeling with resistance training, which do not manifest at the macroscopic level.

Abstract

Costameres are mechano-sensory sites of focal adhesion in the sarcolemma that provide a structural anchor for myofibrils. Their turnover is regulated by integrin-associated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). We hypothesized that changes in content of costamere components (beta 1 integrin, FAK, meta-vinculin, gamma-vinculin) with increased and reduced loading of human anti-gravity muscle would: (i) relate to changes in muscle size and molecular parameters of muscle size regulation [p70S6K, myosin heavy chain (MHC)1 and MHCIIA]; (ii) correspond to adjustments in activity and expression of FAK, and its negative regulator, FRNK; and (iii) reflect the temporal response to reduced and increased loading. Unloading induced a progressive decline in thickness of human vastus lateralis muscle after 8 and 34 days of bedrest (-4% and -14%, respectively; n = 9), contrasting the increase in muscle thickness after 10 and 27 days of resistance training (+5% and +13%; n = 6). Changes in muscle thickness were correlated with changes in cross-sectional area of type I muscle fibers (r = 0.66) and beta 1 integrin content (r = 0.76) at the mid-point of altered loading. Changes in meta-vinculin and FAK-pY397 content were correlated (r = 0.85) and differed, together with the changes of beta 1 integrin, MHCI, MHCII and p70S6K, between the mid- and end-point of resistance training. By contrast, costamere protein level changes did not differ between time points of bedrest. The findings emphasize the role of FAK-regulated costamere turnover in the load-dependent addition and removal of myofibrils, and argue for two phases of muscle remodeling with resistance training, which do not manifest at the macroscopic level.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2013
Deposited On:28 Jan 2014 17:35
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 08:34
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0021-8782
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.12101
PubMed ID:24010829

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