Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Megaherbivores as pacemakers of carnivore diversity and biomass: distributing or sinking trophic energy


Hummel, J; Clauss, Marcus (2008). Megaherbivores as pacemakers of carnivore diversity and biomass: distributing or sinking trophic energy. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 10:925-930.

Abstract

Question: What is the trophic role of megaherbivores?
Hypothesis: Depending on their life histories, megaherbivores can either act as sinks or distributors of trophic energy.
Methods: Comparative review of mammal and dinosaur faunas, and aspects of their reproductive biology.
Conclusion: Extant (mammalian) megaherbivore populations represent trophic sinks that potentially limit carnivore diversity and productivity, because they are immune to predation and follow a reproductive strategy of very few, well-protected offspring. In contrast, in dinosaur faunas, particularities of reproductive biology such as a larger number of offspring and limited parental care made a major part of megaherbivore biomass available to carnivores. This increase in available trophic energy in consequence allowed for larger body masses and higher species diversity of dinosaur carnivores.

Abstract

Question: What is the trophic role of megaherbivores?
Hypothesis: Depending on their life histories, megaherbivores can either act as sinks or distributors of trophic energy.
Methods: Comparative review of mammal and dinosaur faunas, and aspects of their reproductive biology.
Conclusion: Extant (mammalian) megaherbivore populations represent trophic sinks that potentially limit carnivore diversity and productivity, because they are immune to predation and follow a reproductive strategy of very few, well-protected offspring. In contrast, in dinosaur faunas, particularities of reproductive biology such as a larger number of offspring and limited parental care made a major part of megaherbivore biomass available to carnivores. This increase in available trophic energy in consequence allowed for larger body masses and higher species diversity of dinosaur carnivores.

Statistics

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Downloads

368 downloads since deposited on 22 Dec 2008
36 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:22 Dec 2008 14:07
Last Modified:03 Oct 2016 07:11
Publisher:Evolutionary Ecology Ltd
ISSN:1522-0613
Official URL:http://www.evolutionary-ecology.com/issues/v10n06/mmar2365.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.evolutionary-ecology.com/ (Publisher)

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations