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Gender dependence of serum soluble Klotho in acromegaly


Sze, Lisa; Neidert, Marian C; Bernays, René L; Zwimpfer, Cornelia; Wiesli, Peter; Haile, Sarah R; Brändle, Michael; Schmid, Christoph (2014). Gender dependence of serum soluble Klotho in acromegaly. Clinical Endocrinology, 80(6):869-873.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In acromegaly, disease activity is biochemically assessed by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels. However, they are often discrepant, as several factors including gender influence their relationship. We recently found excessively high serum levels of soluble Klotho (sKl) in acromegalic patients, which depended on GH to a comparable extent as IGF-1. To further elucidate the relationship between GH and sKl, we examined the effect of gender on sKl in patients with untreated acromegaly.
PATIENTS AND DESIGN: We determined GH, IGF-1 and sKl in sera of 62 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly (31 females/31 males, aged 20-85 years).
RESULTS: For their given GH excess at presentation with acromegaly, females had lower IGF-1 (490 ± 33 vs 604 ± 33 ng/ml, P = 0·02), but higher sKl [5171 ± 590 vs 3439 ± 431 pg/ml (mean ± SE), P = 0·02] levels than males. In multiple regression analysis, IGF-1 was closely associated with logGH (estimate 139, SE 47, P = 0·005) and BMI (estimate 14·2, SE 4·8, P = 0·005). sKl was closely associated with logGH (estimate 3088, SE 652, P = 0·0001) and gender (estimate 2034, SE 612, P = 0·002), and to a lesser extent with BMI (estimate 174, SE 66, P = 0·01).
CONCLUSIONS: For a given GH status, sKl concentrations are higher and IGF-1 concentrations are lower in women than in men. GH is the strongest predictor for both sKl and IGF-1, but gender needs to be considered when using these parameters for monitoring acromegalic patients.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In acromegaly, disease activity is biochemically assessed by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels. However, they are often discrepant, as several factors including gender influence their relationship. We recently found excessively high serum levels of soluble Klotho (sKl) in acromegalic patients, which depended on GH to a comparable extent as IGF-1. To further elucidate the relationship between GH and sKl, we examined the effect of gender on sKl in patients with untreated acromegaly.
PATIENTS AND DESIGN: We determined GH, IGF-1 and sKl in sera of 62 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly (31 females/31 males, aged 20-85 years).
RESULTS: For their given GH excess at presentation with acromegaly, females had lower IGF-1 (490 ± 33 vs 604 ± 33 ng/ml, P = 0·02), but higher sKl [5171 ± 590 vs 3439 ± 431 pg/ml (mean ± SE), P = 0·02] levels than males. In multiple regression analysis, IGF-1 was closely associated with logGH (estimate 139, SE 47, P = 0·005) and BMI (estimate 14·2, SE 4·8, P = 0·005). sKl was closely associated with logGH (estimate 3088, SE 652, P = 0·0001) and gender (estimate 2034, SE 612, P = 0·002), and to a lesser extent with BMI (estimate 174, SE 66, P = 0·01).
CONCLUSIONS: For a given GH status, sKl concentrations are higher and IGF-1 concentrations are lower in women than in men. GH is the strongest predictor for both sKl and IGF-1, but gender needs to be considered when using these parameters for monitoring acromegalic patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:23 Jan 2014 13:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:29
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0300-0664
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cen.12385
PubMed ID:24330426

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