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Dual electroencephalogram markers of human sleep homeostasis: correlation between theta activity in waking and slow-wave activity in sleep.


Finelli, L A; Baumann, H; Borbely, A A; Achermann, P (2000). Dual electroencephalogram markers of human sleep homeostasis: correlation between theta activity in waking and slow-wave activity in sleep. Neuroscience, 101(3):523-529.

Abstract

To investigate the relationship between markers of sleep homeostasis during waking and sleep, the electroencephalogram of eight young males was recorded intermittently during a 40-h waking episode, as well as during baseline and recovery sleep. In the course of extended waking, spectral power of the electroencephalogram in the 5-8Hz band (theta activity) increased. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, power in the 0.75-4.5Hz band (slow-wave activity) was enhanced in the recovery night relative to baseline. Comparison of individual records revealed a positive correlation between the rise rate of theta activity during waking and the increase in slow-wave activity in the first non-rapid eye movement sleep episode. A topographic analysis based on 27 derivations showed that both effects were largest in frontal areas.From these results, we suggest that theta activity in waking and slow-wave activity in sleep are markers of a common homeostatic sleep process.

Abstract

To investigate the relationship between markers of sleep homeostasis during waking and sleep, the electroencephalogram of eight young males was recorded intermittently during a 40-h waking episode, as well as during baseline and recovery sleep. In the course of extended waking, spectral power of the electroencephalogram in the 5-8Hz band (theta activity) increased. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, power in the 0.75-4.5Hz band (slow-wave activity) was enhanced in the recovery night relative to baseline. Comparison of individual records revealed a positive correlation between the rise rate of theta activity during waking and the increase in slow-wave activity in the first non-rapid eye movement sleep episode. A topographic analysis based on 27 derivations showed that both effects were largest in frontal areas.From these results, we suggest that theta activity in waking and slow-wave activity in sleep are markers of a common homeostatic sleep process.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2000
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:19
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 13:03
Publisher:International Brain Research Organization, Elsevier
ISSN:0306-4522
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4522(00)00409-7
PubMed ID:11113301

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