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An X-linked cobalamin disorder caused by mutations in transcriptional coregulator HCFC1 - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Abstract

Derivatives of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) are essential cofactors for enzymes required in intermediary metabolism. Defects in cobalamin metabolism lead to disorders characterized by the accumulation of methylmalonic acid and/or homocysteine in blood and urine. The most common inborn error of cobalamin metabolism, combined methylmalonic acidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia, cblC type, is caused by mutations in MMACHC. However, several individuals with presumed cblC based on cellular and biochemical analysis do not have mutations in MMACHC. We used exome sequencing to identify the genetic basis of an X-linked form of combined methylmalonic acidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia, designated cblX. A missense mutation in a global transcriptional coregulator, HCFC1, was identified in the index case. Additional male subjects were ascertained through two international diagnostic laboratories, and 13/17 had one of five distinct missense mutations affecting three highly conserved amino acids within the HCFC1 kelch domain. A common phenotype of severe neurological symptoms including intractable epilepsy and profound neurocognitive impairment, along with variable biochemical manifestations, was observed in all affected subjects compared to individuals with early-onset cblC. The severe reduction in MMACHC mRNA and protein within subject fibroblast lines suggested a role for HCFC1 in transcriptional regulation of MMACHC, which was further supported by the identification of consensus HCFC1 binding sites in MMACHC. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of HCFC1 expression resulted in the coordinate downregulation of MMACHC mRNA. This X-linked disorder demonstrates a distinct disease mechanism by which transcriptional dysregulation leads to an inborn error of metabolism with a complex clinical phenotype.

Abstract

Derivatives of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) are essential cofactors for enzymes required in intermediary metabolism. Defects in cobalamin metabolism lead to disorders characterized by the accumulation of methylmalonic acid and/or homocysteine in blood and urine. The most common inborn error of cobalamin metabolism, combined methylmalonic acidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia, cblC type, is caused by mutations in MMACHC. However, several individuals with presumed cblC based on cellular and biochemical analysis do not have mutations in MMACHC. We used exome sequencing to identify the genetic basis of an X-linked form of combined methylmalonic acidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia, designated cblX. A missense mutation in a global transcriptional coregulator, HCFC1, was identified in the index case. Additional male subjects were ascertained through two international diagnostic laboratories, and 13/17 had one of five distinct missense mutations affecting three highly conserved amino acids within the HCFC1 kelch domain. A common phenotype of severe neurological symptoms including intractable epilepsy and profound neurocognitive impairment, along with variable biochemical manifestations, was observed in all affected subjects compared to individuals with early-onset cblC. The severe reduction in MMACHC mRNA and protein within subject fibroblast lines suggested a role for HCFC1 in transcriptional regulation of MMACHC, which was further supported by the identification of consensus HCFC1 binding sites in MMACHC. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of HCFC1 expression resulted in the coordinate downregulation of MMACHC mRNA. This X-linked disorder demonstrates a distinct disease mechanism by which transcriptional dysregulation leads to an inborn error of metabolism with a complex clinical phenotype.

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37 citations in Web of Science®
34 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:04 Feb 2014 15:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:30
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:0002-9297
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2013.07.022
PubMed ID:24011988

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