Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Cocaine users manifest impaired prosodic and cross-modal emotion processing


Hulka, L M; Preller, K H; Vonmoos, M; Broicher, S D; Quednow, B B (2013). Cocaine users manifest impaired prosodic and cross-modal emotion processing. Frontiers in Psychiatry:4:98.

Abstract

Background: A small number of previous studies have provided evidence that cocaine users (CU) exhibit impairments in complex social cognition tasks, while the more basic facial emotion recognition is widely unaffected. However, prosody and cross-modal emotion processing has not been systematically investigated in CU so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess complex multisensory emotion processing in CU in comparison to controls and to examine a potential association with drug use patterns. Method: The abbreviated version of the comprehensive affect testing system (CATS-A) was used to measure emotion perception across the three channels of facial affect, prosody, and semantic content in 58 CU and 48 healthy control (HC) subjects who were matched for age, sex, verbal intelligence, and years of education. Results: CU had significantly lower scores than controls in the quotient scales of "emotion recognition" and "prosody recognition" and the subtests "conflicting prosody/meaning - attend to prosody" and "match emotional prosody to emotional face" either requiring to attend to prosody or to integrate cross-modal information. In contrast, no group difference emerged for the "affect recognition quotient." Cumulative cocaine doses and duration of cocaine use correlated negatively with emotion processing. Conclusion: CU show impaired cross-modal integration of different emotion processing channels particularly with regard to prosody, whereas more basic aspects of emotion processing such as facial affect perception are comparable to the performance of HC.

Abstract

Background: A small number of previous studies have provided evidence that cocaine users (CU) exhibit impairments in complex social cognition tasks, while the more basic facial emotion recognition is widely unaffected. However, prosody and cross-modal emotion processing has not been systematically investigated in CU so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess complex multisensory emotion processing in CU in comparison to controls and to examine a potential association with drug use patterns. Method: The abbreviated version of the comprehensive affect testing system (CATS-A) was used to measure emotion perception across the three channels of facial affect, prosody, and semantic content in 58 CU and 48 healthy control (HC) subjects who were matched for age, sex, verbal intelligence, and years of education. Results: CU had significantly lower scores than controls in the quotient scales of "emotion recognition" and "prosody recognition" and the subtests "conflicting prosody/meaning - attend to prosody" and "match emotional prosody to emotional face" either requiring to attend to prosody or to integrate cross-modal information. In contrast, no group difference emerged for the "affect recognition quotient." Cumulative cocaine doses and duration of cocaine use correlated negatively with emotion processing. Conclusion: CU show impaired cross-modal integration of different emotion processing channels particularly with regard to prosody, whereas more basic aspects of emotion processing such as facial affect perception are comparable to the performance of HC.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

33 downloads since deposited on 29 Jan 2014
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:5 September 2013
Deposited On:29 Jan 2014 11:53
Last Modified:07 Aug 2017 06:24
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-0640
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2013.00098
PubMed ID:24046750

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 396kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations