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Diet-induced pseudohypoparathyroidism: A hypocalcemia and milk fever risk factor


Goff, Jesse P; Liesegang, Annette; Horst, R L (2014). Diet-induced pseudohypoparathyroidism: A hypocalcemia and milk fever risk factor. Journal of Dairy Science, 97(3):1520-1528.

Abstract

Subclinical hypocalcemia may affect half of all multiparous cows, and clinical hypocalcemia or milk fever affects approximately 5% of dairy cows each year. This disorder of calcium homeostasis can be induced by several dietary factors. Recent studies implicate high dietary potassium and high dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) with increased risk of milk fever. The hypothesis tested in this study was that high-DCAD diets fed to prepartum cows reduce tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone (PTH), inducing a pseudohypoparathyroid state that diminishes calcium homeostatic responses. Multiparous Jersey cows were fed low- or high-DCAD diets in late gestation, creating a compensated metabolic alkalosis in the high-DCAD cows and a compensated metabolic acidosis in the low-DCAD cows. They then received synthetic PTH injections at 3-h intervals for 48 h. Parathyroid hormone is expected to cause an increase in plasma calcium by increasing renal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and increasing bone calcium resorption. Plasma calcium concentration increased at a significantly lower rate in cows fed the high-DCAD diet. Cows fed the high-DCAD diet also produced significantly less 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in response to the PTH injections than cows fed the low-DCAD diet. Serum concentrations of the bone resorption marker carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen were numerically lower in cows fed the high-DCAD diet but this difference was not statistically significant. These data provide direct evidence that high-DCAD diets reduce tissue sensitivity to PTH. The metabolic alkalosis associated with high-DCAD diets likely induces a state of pseudohypoparathyroidism in some dairy cows at the onset of lactation, resulting in hypocalcemia and milk fever.

Abstract

Subclinical hypocalcemia may affect half of all multiparous cows, and clinical hypocalcemia or milk fever affects approximately 5% of dairy cows each year. This disorder of calcium homeostasis can be induced by several dietary factors. Recent studies implicate high dietary potassium and high dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) with increased risk of milk fever. The hypothesis tested in this study was that high-DCAD diets fed to prepartum cows reduce tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone (PTH), inducing a pseudohypoparathyroid state that diminishes calcium homeostatic responses. Multiparous Jersey cows were fed low- or high-DCAD diets in late gestation, creating a compensated metabolic alkalosis in the high-DCAD cows and a compensated metabolic acidosis in the low-DCAD cows. They then received synthetic PTH injections at 3-h intervals for 48 h. Parathyroid hormone is expected to cause an increase in plasma calcium by increasing renal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and increasing bone calcium resorption. Plasma calcium concentration increased at a significantly lower rate in cows fed the high-DCAD diet. Cows fed the high-DCAD diet also produced significantly less 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in response to the PTH injections than cows fed the low-DCAD diet. Serum concentrations of the bone resorption marker carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen were numerically lower in cows fed the high-DCAD diet but this difference was not statistically significant. These data provide direct evidence that high-DCAD diets reduce tissue sensitivity to PTH. The metabolic alkalosis associated with high-DCAD diets likely induces a state of pseudohypoparathyroidism in some dairy cows at the onset of lactation, resulting in hypocalcemia and milk fever.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Animal Nutrition
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:24 Jan 2014 10:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-0302
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2013-7467

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