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Delineating the whole brain BOLD response to passive movement kinematics


Sulzer, James; Duenas, Julio; Stampili, Philipp; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kollias, Spyros; Seifritz, Erich; Gassert, Roger (2013). Delineating the whole brain BOLD response to passive movement kinematics. IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. Proceedings, 2013:1-5.

Abstract

The field of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) has made great advances in recent years, converting thought to movement, with some of the most successful implementations measuring directly from the motor cortex. However, the ability to record from additional regions of the brain could potentially improve flexibility and robustness of use. In addition, BMIs of the future will benefit from integrating kinesthesia into the control loop. Here, we examine whether changes in passively induced forefinger movement amplitude are represented in different regions than forefinger velocity via a MR compatible robotic manipulandum. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), five healthy participants were exposed to combinations of forefinger movement amplitude and velocity in a factorial design followed by an epoch-based analysis. We found that primary and secondary somatosensory regions were activated, as well as cingulate motor area, putamen and cerebellum, with greater activity from changes in velocity compared to changes in amplitude. This represents the first investigation into whole brain response to parametric changes in passive movement kinematics. In addition to informing BMIs, these results have implications towards neural correlates of robotic rehabilitation.

Abstract

The field of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) has made great advances in recent years, converting thought to movement, with some of the most successful implementations measuring directly from the motor cortex. However, the ability to record from additional regions of the brain could potentially improve flexibility and robustness of use. In addition, BMIs of the future will benefit from integrating kinesthesia into the control loop. Here, we examine whether changes in passively induced forefinger movement amplitude are represented in different regions than forefinger velocity via a MR compatible robotic manipulandum. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), five healthy participants were exposed to combinations of forefinger movement amplitude and velocity in a factorial design followed by an epoch-based analysis. We found that primary and secondary somatosensory regions were activated, as well as cingulate motor area, putamen and cerebellum, with greater activity from changes in velocity compared to changes in amplitude. This represents the first investigation into whole brain response to parametric changes in passive movement kinematics. In addition to informing BMIs, these results have implications towards neural correlates of robotic rehabilitation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Feb 2014 15:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:30
Publisher:Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ISSN:1945-7898
Additional Information:ISBN: 978-1-4673-6022-7.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2013.6650474
PubMed ID:24187291

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