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Oxygenation and ventilation characteristics in obese sedated dogs before and after weight loss: A clinical trial


Mosing, M; German, A J; Holden, S L; MacFarlane, P; Biourge, V; Morris, P J; Iff, I (2013). Oxygenation and ventilation characteristics in obese sedated dogs before and after weight loss: A clinical trial. The Veterinary Journal, 198(2):367-371.

Abstract

This prospective clinical study examined the effect of obesity and subsequent weight loss on oxygenation and ventilation during deep sedation in pet dogs. Data from nine dogs completing a formalised weight loss programme were evaluated. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to quantify body fat mass prior to and after weight loss. Dogs were deeply sedated and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Sedation was scored using a semi-objective scheme. As part of the monitoring of sedation, arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) were measured after 10 min in dorsal recumbency. Oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (SpO2) was monitored continuously using pulse oximetry, starting oxygen supplementation where indicated (SpO2 < 90%) via a face mask. Morphometric measurements were taken from DEXA images and compared before and after weight loss. Several oxygen indices were calculated and correlated with body fat variables evaluated by DEXA.

All body fat variables improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2 increased from 27.9 ± 19.2 kPa to 34.8 ± 24.4 kPa, while FiO2 decreased from 0.74 ± 0.31 to 0.66 ± 0.35. Morphometric measurements improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2/FiO2 (inspired oxygen fraction) and Pa/AO2 (ratio of PaO2 to alveolar PO2) also improved significantly, but there was no change in f-shunt and PaCO2 after weight loss. On multiple linear regression analysis, all oxygen indices were negatively associated with thoracic fat percentage. In conclusion, obesity decreases oxygenation in dogs during deep sedation. Oxygenation status improves with successful weight loss, but ventilation is not influenced by obesity.

Abstract

This prospective clinical study examined the effect of obesity and subsequent weight loss on oxygenation and ventilation during deep sedation in pet dogs. Data from nine dogs completing a formalised weight loss programme were evaluated. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to quantify body fat mass prior to and after weight loss. Dogs were deeply sedated and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Sedation was scored using a semi-objective scheme. As part of the monitoring of sedation, arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) were measured after 10 min in dorsal recumbency. Oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (SpO2) was monitored continuously using pulse oximetry, starting oxygen supplementation where indicated (SpO2 < 90%) via a face mask. Morphometric measurements were taken from DEXA images and compared before and after weight loss. Several oxygen indices were calculated and correlated with body fat variables evaluated by DEXA.

All body fat variables improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2 increased from 27.9 ± 19.2 kPa to 34.8 ± 24.4 kPa, while FiO2 decreased from 0.74 ± 0.31 to 0.66 ± 0.35. Morphometric measurements improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2/FiO2 (inspired oxygen fraction) and Pa/AO2 (ratio of PaO2 to alveolar PO2) also improved significantly, but there was no change in f-shunt and PaCO2 after weight loss. On multiple linear regression analysis, all oxygen indices were negatively associated with thoracic fat percentage. In conclusion, obesity decreases oxygenation in dogs during deep sedation. Oxygenation status improves with successful weight loss, but ventilation is not influenced by obesity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Feb 2014 14:13
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 02:58
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-0233
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.08.008

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