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The survey on cellular and engineered tissue therapies in Europe in 2011


Martin, Ivan; Baldomero, Helen; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Ireland, Hilary; Passweg, Jakob; Tyndall, Alan (2014). The survey on cellular and engineered tissue therapies in Europe in 2011. Tissue Engineering. Part A, 20(3-4):842-853.

Abstract

Following the coordinated efforts of five established scientific organizations, this report describes the "novel cellular therapy" activity (i.e., cellular treatments excluding hematopoietic stem cells [HSC] for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis) in Europe for the year 2011. Two hundred forty-six teams from 35 countries responded to the cellular therapy survey, 126 teams from 24 countries provided data on 1759 patients using a dedicated survey and 120 teams reported no activity. Indications were musculoskeletal/rheumatological disorders (46%; 99% autologous), cardiovascular disorders (22%; 100% autologous), hematology/oncology, predominantly including the prevention or treatment of graft-versus-host disease (18%; 2% autologous), neurological disorders (2%; 83% autologous), gastrointestinal (1%; 68% autologous), and other indications (12%; 77% autologous). Autologous cells were used predominantly for musculoskeletal/rheumatological (58%) and cardiovascular (27%) disorders, whereas allogeneic cells were used mainly for hematology/oncology (84%). The reported cell types were mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (56%), HSC (23%), chondrocytes (12%), dermal fibroblasts (3%), keratinocytes (2%), and others (4%). In 40% of the grafts, cells were delivered following ex vivo expansion, whereas cells were transduced or sorted, respectively, in 3% and 10% of the reported cases. Cells were delivered intraorgan (42%), intravenously (26%), on a membrane or gel (16%), or using 3D scaffolds (16%). Compared to last year, the number of teams participating in the dedicated survey doubled and, for the first time, all European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation teams reporting information on cellular therapies completed the extended questionnaire. The data are compared with those collected since 2008 to identify trends in the field. This year's edition specifically focuses on cardiac cell therapy.

Abstract

Following the coordinated efforts of five established scientific organizations, this report describes the "novel cellular therapy" activity (i.e., cellular treatments excluding hematopoietic stem cells [HSC] for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis) in Europe for the year 2011. Two hundred forty-six teams from 35 countries responded to the cellular therapy survey, 126 teams from 24 countries provided data on 1759 patients using a dedicated survey and 120 teams reported no activity. Indications were musculoskeletal/rheumatological disorders (46%; 99% autologous), cardiovascular disorders (22%; 100% autologous), hematology/oncology, predominantly including the prevention or treatment of graft-versus-host disease (18%; 2% autologous), neurological disorders (2%; 83% autologous), gastrointestinal (1%; 68% autologous), and other indications (12%; 77% autologous). Autologous cells were used predominantly for musculoskeletal/rheumatological (58%) and cardiovascular (27%) disorders, whereas allogeneic cells were used mainly for hematology/oncology (84%). The reported cell types were mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (56%), HSC (23%), chondrocytes (12%), dermal fibroblasts (3%), keratinocytes (2%), and others (4%). In 40% of the grafts, cells were delivered following ex vivo expansion, whereas cells were transduced or sorted, respectively, in 3% and 10% of the reported cases. Cells were delivered intraorgan (42%), intravenously (26%), on a membrane or gel (16%), or using 3D scaffolds (16%). Compared to last year, the number of teams participating in the dedicated survey doubled and, for the first time, all European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation teams reporting information on cellular therapies completed the extended questionnaire. The data are compared with those collected since 2008 to identify trends in the field. This year's edition specifically focuses on cardiac cell therapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2014
Deposited On:10 Feb 2014 15:46
Last Modified:17 Aug 2017 07:30
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1937-3341
Additional Information:This is a copy of an article published in the Tissue Engineering. Part A © 2013 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Tissue Engineering. Part A is available online at: http://www.liebertonline.com.
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEA.2013.0372
PubMed ID:24090467

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