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Requirements for and impact of a serious game for neuro-pediatric robot-assisted gait training


Labruyère, Rob; Gerber, Corinna N; Birrer-Brütsch, Karin; Meyer-Heim, Andreas; van Hedel, Hubertus J A (2013). Requirements for and impact of a serious game for neuro-pediatric robot-assisted gait training. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(11):3906-3915.

Abstract

We investigated whether children with neurological gait disorders who walked in a driven gait orthosis could adjust their participation level according to the demands of a newly developed rehabilitation game. We further investigated if cognitive capacity and motor impairment influenced game performance. Nineteen children with neurological gait disorders (mean age: 13.4 y, 42% girls) participated. To quantify game participation, electromyographic muscle activity (M. rectus femoris) and heart rate were compared in a demanding part and a less demanding part of the game. Cognitive capacity was assessed with the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI-4). Furthermore, the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM), Manual Muscle Tests and a therapist-derived score of how well the child was able to train were assessed. Results showed that muscle activity and heart rate were higher during the demanding part of the game (30.7 ± 22.6 μV; 129.4 ± 15.7 bpm) compared to the less demanding part (16.0 ± 13.4 μV; 124.1 ± 15.9 bpm; p<0.01 for both measures). Game performance correlated moderately with the TONI-4 (r=0.50, p=0.04) and the cognition subscale of the WeeFIM (ρ=0.59, p=0.01). The therapist-derived score correlated significantly with game performance (p=0.75, p<0.01) and the ability to modify muscle activity to the demands of the game (p=-0.72, p<0.01). Receiver operating characteristic analyses revealed that the latter factor differentiated well between those children suitable for the game and those not. We conclude that children with neurological gait disorders are able to modify their activity to the demands of the VR-scenario. However, cognitive function and motor impairment determine to which extent. These results are important for clinical decision-making.

Abstract

We investigated whether children with neurological gait disorders who walked in a driven gait orthosis could adjust their participation level according to the demands of a newly developed rehabilitation game. We further investigated if cognitive capacity and motor impairment influenced game performance. Nineteen children with neurological gait disorders (mean age: 13.4 y, 42% girls) participated. To quantify game participation, electromyographic muscle activity (M. rectus femoris) and heart rate were compared in a demanding part and a less demanding part of the game. Cognitive capacity was assessed with the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI-4). Furthermore, the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM), Manual Muscle Tests and a therapist-derived score of how well the child was able to train were assessed. Results showed that muscle activity and heart rate were higher during the demanding part of the game (30.7 ± 22.6 μV; 129.4 ± 15.7 bpm) compared to the less demanding part (16.0 ± 13.4 μV; 124.1 ± 15.9 bpm; p<0.01 for both measures). Game performance correlated moderately with the TONI-4 (r=0.50, p=0.04) and the cognition subscale of the WeeFIM (ρ=0.59, p=0.01). The therapist-derived score correlated significantly with game performance (p=0.75, p<0.01) and the ability to modify muscle activity to the demands of the game (p=-0.72, p<0.01). Receiver operating characteristic analyses revealed that the latter factor differentiated well between those children suitable for the game and those not. We conclude that children with neurological gait disorders are able to modify their activity to the demands of the VR-scenario. However, cognitive function and motor impairment determine to which extent. These results are important for clinical decision-making.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:06 Feb 2014 13:49
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 03:19
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0891-4222
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2013.07.031
PubMed ID:24025439

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