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Concept and first experimental results of a new ferromagnetic assist device for extra-aortic counterpulsation


Starck, Christoph T; Becker, Jakob; Fuhrer, Roland; Sündermann, Simon; Stark, Jan Wendelin; Falk, Volkmar (2014). Concept and first experimental results of a new ferromagnetic assist device for extra-aortic counterpulsation. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 18(1):13-16.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Based on a ferromagnetic silicone cuff for extra-aortic counterpulsation, a new assist device concept was developed. The driving force is generated by an external magnetic field, which leads to contraction of a soft magnetic cuff. The force generation capacity of the device was tested in a silicone aorta model.
METHODS: Magnetic elastomers can be constructed through dispersion of micro- or nanoparticles in polymer matrices and were designed to act as soft actuators. Two magnetically active silicone cuffs were produced with a nanomagnet loading of 250 wt% (Cuff 1) and a micromagnet loading of 67 wt% (Cuff 2). The magnetic cuffs were applied on a silicone aorta model and contracted against hydrostatic pressure.
RESULTS: A full contraction of Cuff 1 was possible against a maximal hydrostatic pressure of 30 cmH2O (22 mmHg) at a magnetic flux density of 0.4 T (Tesla) and 65 cmH2O (48 mmHg) at a magnetic flux density of 1.2 T. A 50% contraction of Cuff 2 was possible against a maximal hydrostatic pressure of 80 cmH2O (59 mmHg) at a magnet-cuff-distance (MCD) of 0 cm. At MCDs of 1 and 2 cm a 50% contraction was possible against 33 cmH2O (24 mmHg) and 10 cmH2O (7 mmHg), respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: Combining the advantages of magnetic elastomers with the principle of extra-aortic counterpulsation in a new assist device concept avoids the need for anticoagulation (no contact with bloodstream). With regard to the magnetic principle of action, no intra- to extracorporeal connection is needed. More experimental work is needed to further increase the force generated by the silicone cuff and to transfer the device concept into an in vivo setting.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Based on a ferromagnetic silicone cuff for extra-aortic counterpulsation, a new assist device concept was developed. The driving force is generated by an external magnetic field, which leads to contraction of a soft magnetic cuff. The force generation capacity of the device was tested in a silicone aorta model.
METHODS: Magnetic elastomers can be constructed through dispersion of micro- or nanoparticles in polymer matrices and were designed to act as soft actuators. Two magnetically active silicone cuffs were produced with a nanomagnet loading of 250 wt% (Cuff 1) and a micromagnet loading of 67 wt% (Cuff 2). The magnetic cuffs were applied on a silicone aorta model and contracted against hydrostatic pressure.
RESULTS: A full contraction of Cuff 1 was possible against a maximal hydrostatic pressure of 30 cmH2O (22 mmHg) at a magnetic flux density of 0.4 T (Tesla) and 65 cmH2O (48 mmHg) at a magnetic flux density of 1.2 T. A 50% contraction of Cuff 2 was possible against a maximal hydrostatic pressure of 80 cmH2O (59 mmHg) at a magnet-cuff-distance (MCD) of 0 cm. At MCDs of 1 and 2 cm a 50% contraction was possible against 33 cmH2O (24 mmHg) and 10 cmH2O (7 mmHg), respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: Combining the advantages of magnetic elastomers with the principle of extra-aortic counterpulsation in a new assist device concept avoids the need for anticoagulation (no contact with bloodstream). With regard to the magnetic principle of action, no intra- to extracorporeal connection is needed. More experimental work is needed to further increase the force generated by the silicone cuff and to transfer the device concept into an in vivo setting.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2014
Deposited On:17 Mar 2014 10:28
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 03:27
Publisher:European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
ISSN:1569-9285
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivt416
PubMed ID:24061069

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