Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Can protective factors moderate the detrimental effects of child maltreatment on personality functioning?


Hengartner, Michael P; Müller, Mario; Rodgers, Stephanie; Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta (2013). Can protective factors moderate the detrimental effects of child maltreatment on personality functioning? Journal of Psychiatric Research, 47(9):1180-1186.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine whether, and if so, to what extent, education and coping strategies may reduce the detrimental effects of childhood maltreatment on personality functioning.
METHODS: We assessed dimensional trait-scores of all 10 DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs), childhood maltreatment, education and three coping styles in 511 subjects of the general population of Zurich, Switzerland, using data from the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey.
RESULTS: Childhood maltreatment was associated with all 10 PDs. Low education was related to antisocial, borderline and histrionic PD. Low emotion-focused coping was associated with paranoid, schizoid, borderline, avoidant, and obsessive-compulsive PD. Low problem-focused coping was related to schizoid PD and high problem-focused coping to histrionic PD. High dysfunctional coping was significantly related to all 10 PD dimensions. Obsessive-compulsive trait scores were significantly lower in maltreated subjects with high emotion-focused coping. Antisocial, borderline and narcissistic trait scores were significantly higher in maltreated subjects with high dysfunctional coping.
CONCLUSION: Education and adaptive coping may have a protective effect on PD symptomatology. Promotion of adaptive coping and suppression of dysfunctional coping may additionally reduce PD symptoms specifically in maltreated subjects. Those findings have important clinical implications. Longitudinal research is needed to address questions of causality and to evaluate potential effects of treatment and intervention.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine whether, and if so, to what extent, education and coping strategies may reduce the detrimental effects of childhood maltreatment on personality functioning.
METHODS: We assessed dimensional trait-scores of all 10 DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs), childhood maltreatment, education and three coping styles in 511 subjects of the general population of Zurich, Switzerland, using data from the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey.
RESULTS: Childhood maltreatment was associated with all 10 PDs. Low education was related to antisocial, borderline and histrionic PD. Low emotion-focused coping was associated with paranoid, schizoid, borderline, avoidant, and obsessive-compulsive PD. Low problem-focused coping was related to schizoid PD and high problem-focused coping to histrionic PD. High dysfunctional coping was significantly related to all 10 PD dimensions. Obsessive-compulsive trait scores were significantly lower in maltreated subjects with high emotion-focused coping. Antisocial, borderline and narcissistic trait scores were significantly higher in maltreated subjects with high dysfunctional coping.
CONCLUSION: Education and adaptive coping may have a protective effect on PD symptomatology. Promotion of adaptive coping and suppression of dysfunctional coping may additionally reduce PD symptoms specifically in maltreated subjects. Those findings have important clinical implications. Longitudinal research is needed to address questions of causality and to evaluate potential effects of treatment and intervention.

Statistics

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:05 Feb 2014 15:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3956
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.05.005
PubMed ID:23743134

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations