Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Influence of time on dermoscopic diagnosis and management


Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Dermoscopy aids in clinical decision-making. However, time pressure is a common reason precluding its use. We evaluated the effect of time on lesion recognition and management decisions utilising clinical and dermoscopic images.
METHOD: In all, 100 dermoscopic images were presented to 15 dermatologists with experience in dermoscopy and seven non-experts (dermatology residents). Each lesion was displayed thrice in succession. The dermoscopic image was initially presented for 1 s (t1). The same dermoscopic image was shown again without time constraints (t2) and then a final time with additional images of the clinical context (t3). Participants provided a diagnosis, their level of confidence and biopsy predilection after evaluating each image.
RESULTS: For benign lesions, both groups rarely changed their diagnosis. However, an improvement in the number of correct benign diagnoses was observed when the lesion was shown in a clinical context. For malignant lesions, both groups improved when more time and clinical context was given; nevertheless, non-experts were more likely to change the diagnosis towards the correct one as more time was given and tended to perform more biopsies, in particular of benign lesions. Limitations were a small number of participants and an artificial study setting.
CONCLUSION: Dermoscopy uses analytical and non-analytical reasoning approaches. We suggest that non-analytical reasoning is employed when rapid clinical decisions need to be made, especially during the evaluation of benign lesions. We conclude that dermoscopy is relatively rapid and non-time-consuming technique that adds relevant information and guides clinicians towards appropriate management decisions.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Dermoscopy aids in clinical decision-making. However, time pressure is a common reason precluding its use. We evaluated the effect of time on lesion recognition and management decisions utilising clinical and dermoscopic images.
METHOD: In all, 100 dermoscopic images were presented to 15 dermatologists with experience in dermoscopy and seven non-experts (dermatology residents). Each lesion was displayed thrice in succession. The dermoscopic image was initially presented for 1 s (t1). The same dermoscopic image was shown again without time constraints (t2) and then a final time with additional images of the clinical context (t3). Participants provided a diagnosis, their level of confidence and biopsy predilection after evaluating each image.
RESULTS: For benign lesions, both groups rarely changed their diagnosis. However, an improvement in the number of correct benign diagnoses was observed when the lesion was shown in a clinical context. For malignant lesions, both groups improved when more time and clinical context was given; nevertheless, non-experts were more likely to change the diagnosis towards the correct one as more time was given and tended to perform more biopsies, in particular of benign lesions. Limitations were a small number of participants and an artificial study setting.
CONCLUSION: Dermoscopy uses analytical and non-analytical reasoning approaches. We suggest that non-analytical reasoning is employed when rapid clinical decisions need to be made, especially during the evaluation of benign lesions. We conclude that dermoscopy is relatively rapid and non-time-consuming technique that adds relevant information and guides clinicians towards appropriate management decisions.

Statistics

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 12 Feb 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:12 Feb 2014 15:12
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 03:38
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0004-8380
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ajd.12001
PubMed ID:23190378

Download