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Virus-induced humoral immunity: on how B cell responses are initiated


Zabel, Franziska; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F (2013). Virus-induced humoral immunity: on how B cell responses are initiated. Current Opinion in Virology, 3(3):357-362.

Abstract

Most antiviral vaccines are based on viral particles, which are efficient inducers of B cell responses. In addition to their ability to replicate, several features associated with the structure and content of the viral particles are responsible for this high immunogenicity. First, viral particles usually have dimensions between 20 and 200 nm, a size optimal for drainage to lymph nodes and direct interaction with B cells. Second, the surface of most viral particles is highly repetitive, causing efficient cross-linking of B cell receptors, an early and key step of B cell activation. In addition, such repetitive structures bind natural antibodies and fix complement, further enhancing B cell activation as well as transport to and deposition on follicular dendritic cells. Third, viral particles carry ligands for toll-like receptor 7/8 or 9 which activate B cells directly for isotype switching as well as dendritic cells for T cell priming. In this review, we will highlight recent insights in these mechanisms and discuss their impact on antiviral antibody responses.

Abstract

Most antiviral vaccines are based on viral particles, which are efficient inducers of B cell responses. In addition to their ability to replicate, several features associated with the structure and content of the viral particles are responsible for this high immunogenicity. First, viral particles usually have dimensions between 20 and 200 nm, a size optimal for drainage to lymph nodes and direct interaction with B cells. Second, the surface of most viral particles is highly repetitive, causing efficient cross-linking of B cell receptors, an early and key step of B cell activation. In addition, such repetitive structures bind natural antibodies and fix complement, further enhancing B cell activation as well as transport to and deposition on follicular dendritic cells. Third, viral particles carry ligands for toll-like receptor 7/8 or 9 which activate B cells directly for isotype switching as well as dendritic cells for T cell priming. In this review, we will highlight recent insights in these mechanisms and discuss their impact on antiviral antibody responses.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:11 Feb 2014 13:49
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 03:43
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1879-6257
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.coviro.2013.05.004
PubMed ID:23731601

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