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Negotiating demands of social change in young and middle-aged adults from Poland


Tomasik, Martin J; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Lechner, Clemens M; Wasilewski, Jacek (2013). Negotiating demands of social change in young and middle-aged adults from Poland. International Journal of Stress Management, 20(3):222-253.

Abstract

Social and economic changes on the societal macro level, such as globalization, pluralization, and demographic shifts, create new demands that produce stress and require behavioral adaptation. In this large-sample correlational study, which replicates a similar study previously conducted in Germany, we investigated how young and middle-aged adults from Poland (N = 2,541) negotiated these demands. Dependent variables were engagement and disengagement strategies as defined by the motivational theory of life span development. By using planned contrasts between engagement (selective primary, selective secondary, and compensatory primary control) and disengagement (compensatory secondary control) in a repeated-measures ANOVA, we found a strong (η² = .48) preference for engagement over disengagement. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that the engagement and disengagement strategies were only modestly related to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, gender, employment, and partnership status (.00 < |β| < .13). Primary appraisal of the demands in terms of challenge/threat and gains/losses were correlated with engagement and disengagement (.01 < |β| < .16), but direction and size of the coefficients differed from what was previously found in Germany. Secondary appraisal of the demands in terms of their controllability (.04 < |β| < .21) and the perceived load of demands itself (.12 < |β| < .22) turned out to be the most relevant predictors of the engagement and disengagement strategies. By contrasting these results against earlier findings obtained in Germany, we argue that the differences in how people negotiate social change in the two countries are rooted in their different systems of welfare and social security.

Abstract

Social and economic changes on the societal macro level, such as globalization, pluralization, and demographic shifts, create new demands that produce stress and require behavioral adaptation. In this large-sample correlational study, which replicates a similar study previously conducted in Germany, we investigated how young and middle-aged adults from Poland (N = 2,541) negotiated these demands. Dependent variables were engagement and disengagement strategies as defined by the motivational theory of life span development. By using planned contrasts between engagement (selective primary, selective secondary, and compensatory primary control) and disengagement (compensatory secondary control) in a repeated-measures ANOVA, we found a strong (η² = .48) preference for engagement over disengagement. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that the engagement and disengagement strategies were only modestly related to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, gender, employment, and partnership status (.00 < |β| < .13). Primary appraisal of the demands in terms of challenge/threat and gains/losses were correlated with engagement and disengagement (.01 < |β| < .16), but direction and size of the coefficients differed from what was previously found in Germany. Secondary appraisal of the demands in terms of their controllability (.04 < |β| < .21) and the perceived load of demands itself (.12 < |β| < .22) turned out to be the most relevant predictors of the engagement and disengagement strategies. By contrasting these results against earlier findings obtained in Germany, we argue that the differences in how people negotiate social change in the two countries are rooted in their different systems of welfare and social security.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:20 Feb 2014 11:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:40
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:1072-5245
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0033935

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