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Urinary alpha1-antichymotrypsin: a biomarker of prion infection


Miele, G; Seeger, H; Marino, D; Eberhard, R; Heikenwalder, M; Stoeck, K; Basagni, M; Knight, R; Green, A; Chianini, F; Wüthrich, R P; Hock, C; Zerr, I; Aguzzi, A (2008). Urinary alpha1-antichymotrypsin: a biomarker of prion infection. PLoS ONE, 3(12):e3870.

Abstract

The occurrence of blood-borne prion transmission incidents calls for identification of potential prion carriers. However, current methods for intravital diagnosis of prion disease rely on invasive tissue biopsies and are unsuitable for large-scale screening. Sensitive biomarkers may help meeting this need. Here we scanned the genome for transcripts elevated upon prion infection and encoding secreted proteins. We found that alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin (alpha(1)-ACT) was highly upregulated in brains of scrapie-infected mice. Furthermore, alpha(1)-ACT levels were dramatically increased in urine of patients suffering from sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and increased progressively throughout the disease. Increased alpha(1)-ACT excretion was also found in cases of natural prion disease of animals. Therefore measurement of urinary alpha(1)-ACT levels may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic regimens for prion disease, and possibly also for deferring blood and organ donors that may be at risk of transmitting prion infections.

Abstract

The occurrence of blood-borne prion transmission incidents calls for identification of potential prion carriers. However, current methods for intravital diagnosis of prion disease rely on invasive tissue biopsies and are unsuitable for large-scale screening. Sensitive biomarkers may help meeting this need. Here we scanned the genome for transcripts elevated upon prion infection and encoding secreted proteins. We found that alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin (alpha(1)-ACT) was highly upregulated in brains of scrapie-infected mice. Furthermore, alpha(1)-ACT levels were dramatically increased in urine of patients suffering from sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and increased progressively throughout the disease. Increased alpha(1)-ACT excretion was also found in cases of natural prion disease of animals. Therefore measurement of urinary alpha(1)-ACT levels may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic regimens for prion disease, and possibly also for deferring blood and organ donors that may be at risk of transmitting prion infections.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nephrology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:5 December 2008
Deposited On:30 Dec 2008 15:39
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 14:57
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0003870
PubMed ID:19057641

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