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Thrombosis of a developmental venous anomaly in inflammatory bowel disease: case report and radiologic follow-up


Pilato, Fabio; Calandrelli, Rosalinda; Gaudino, Simona; Profice, Paolo; Martucci, Matia; Esposito, Giuseppe; Colosimo, Cesare; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo (2013). Thrombosis of a developmental venous anomaly in inflammatory bowel disease: case report and radiologic follow-up. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 22(7):e250-e253.

Abstract

Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are benign embryologic vascular variants, and before the advent of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were supposed to be rare conditions. Usually, DVAs are asymptomatic and accidentally discovered during routine brain imaging studies, but sometimes they can be the cause of disabling neurologic symptoms. We describe the clinical and neuroradiologic follow-up of a 62-year-old man with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting with new onset epilepsy and intracranial hemorrhage caused by thrombosis of a DVA who fully recovered after treatment with oral anticoagulant therapy. Patients with IBD have an increased risk of thrombosis because of inflammatory activity and the hypercoagulable state. Here we describe the first case of DVA thrombosis in a patient with IBD, and we show clinical and neuroradiologic follow-up after anticoagulant therapy.

Abstract

Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are benign embryologic vascular variants, and before the advent of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were supposed to be rare conditions. Usually, DVAs are asymptomatic and accidentally discovered during routine brain imaging studies, but sometimes they can be the cause of disabling neurologic symptoms. We describe the clinical and neuroradiologic follow-up of a 62-year-old man with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting with new onset epilepsy and intracranial hemorrhage caused by thrombosis of a DVA who fully recovered after treatment with oral anticoagulant therapy. Patients with IBD have an increased risk of thrombosis because of inflammatory activity and the hypercoagulable state. Here we describe the first case of DVA thrombosis in a patient with IBD, and we show clinical and neuroradiologic follow-up after anticoagulant therapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Mar 2014 13:56
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 04:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1052-3057
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2012.11.022
PubMed ID:23287422

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