Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Modulation of synchrony without changes in firing rates


Heinzle, J; König, P; Salazar, R F (2007). Modulation of synchrony without changes in firing rates. Cognitive Neurodynamics, 1(3):225-235.

Abstract

It was often reported and suggested that the synchronization of spikes can occur without changes in the firing rate. However, few theoretical studies have tested its mechanistic validity. In the present study, we investigate whether changes in synaptic weights can induce an independent modulation of synchrony while the firing rate remains constant. We study this question at the level of both single neurons and neuronal populations using network simulations of conductance based integrate-and-fire neurons. The network consists of a single layer that includes local excitatory and inhibitory recurrent connections, as well as long-range excitatory projections targeting both classes of neurons. Each neuron in the network receives external input consisting of uncorrelated Poisson spike trains. We find that increasing this external input leads to a linear increase of activity in the network, as well as an increase in the peak frequency of oscillation. In contrast, balanced changes of the synaptic weight of excitatory long-range projections for both classes of postsynaptic neurons modulate the degree of synchronization without altering the firing rate. These results demonstrate that, in a simple network, synchronization and firing rate can be modulated independently, and thus, may be used as independent coding dimensions.

Abstract

It was often reported and suggested that the synchronization of spikes can occur without changes in the firing rate. However, few theoretical studies have tested its mechanistic validity. In the present study, we investigate whether changes in synaptic weights can induce an independent modulation of synchrony while the firing rate remains constant. We study this question at the level of both single neurons and neuronal populations using network simulations of conductance based integrate-and-fire neurons. The network consists of a single layer that includes local excitatory and inhibitory recurrent connections, as well as long-range excitatory projections targeting both classes of neurons. Each neuron in the network receives external input consisting of uncorrelated Poisson spike trains. We find that increasing this external input leads to a linear increase of activity in the network, as well as an increase in the peak frequency of oscillation. In contrast, balanced changes of the synaptic weight of excitatory long-range projections for both classes of postsynaptic neurons modulate the degree of synchronization without altering the firing rate. These results demonstrate that, in a simple network, synchronization and firing rate can be modulated independently, and thus, may be used as independent coding dimensions.

Statistics

Citations

14 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:21 Mar 2014 13:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:41
Publisher:Springer Netherlands
Number of Pages:1
ISSN:1871-4080
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11571-007-9017-x
PubMed ID:19003515

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations