Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Coronary computed tomography angiography with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination


Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Bull, Sacha; Dougoud, Svetlana; Clerc, Olivier F; Herzog, Bernhard A; Buechel, Ronny R; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A (2014). Coronary computed tomography angiography with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination. European Heart Journal, 35(17):1131-1136.

Abstract

AIMS: To evaluate the feasibility and image quality of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) acquisition with a submillisievert fraction of effective radiation dose using model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) for noise reduction.
METHODS AND RESULTS: In 42 patients undergoing standard low-dose (100-120 kV; 450-700 mA) and additional ultra-low-dose CCTA (80-100 kV; 150-210 mA) reconstructed with MBIR, segmental image quality was graded on a four-point scale [(i): non-evaluative, (ii): good, (iii): adequate, and (iv): excellent]. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated dividing left main artery (LMA) and right coronary artery (RCA) attenuation by the aortic root noise. Over a wide range of body mass index (18-40 kg/m(2)), the estimated median radiation dose exposure was 1.19 mSv [interquartile range (IQR): 1.07-1.30 mSv] for standard and 0.21 mSv (IQR: 0.18-0.23 mSv) for ultra-low-dose CCTA (P < 0.001). The median image quality score per segment was 3.5 (IQR: 3.0-4.0) in standard CCTA vs. 3.5 (IQR: 2.5-4.0) in ultra-low dose with MBIR (P = 0.29). Diagnostic image quality (scores 2-4) was found in 98.7 vs. 97.8% coronary segments (P = 0.36). Introduction of MBIR for ultra-low-dose CCTA resulted in a significant increase in SNR (P < 0.001) for LMA (from 15 ± 5 to 29 ± 7) and RCA (from 14 ± 4 to 27 ± 6) despite 82% dose reduction.
CONCLUSION: Coronary computed tomography angiography acquisition with diagnostic image quality is feasible at an ultra-low radiation dose of 0.21 mSv, e.g. in the range reported for a postero-anterior and lateral chest X-ray.

Abstract

AIMS: To evaluate the feasibility and image quality of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) acquisition with a submillisievert fraction of effective radiation dose using model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) for noise reduction.
METHODS AND RESULTS: In 42 patients undergoing standard low-dose (100-120 kV; 450-700 mA) and additional ultra-low-dose CCTA (80-100 kV; 150-210 mA) reconstructed with MBIR, segmental image quality was graded on a four-point scale [(i): non-evaluative, (ii): good, (iii): adequate, and (iv): excellent]. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated dividing left main artery (LMA) and right coronary artery (RCA) attenuation by the aortic root noise. Over a wide range of body mass index (18-40 kg/m(2)), the estimated median radiation dose exposure was 1.19 mSv [interquartile range (IQR): 1.07-1.30 mSv] for standard and 0.21 mSv (IQR: 0.18-0.23 mSv) for ultra-low-dose CCTA (P < 0.001). The median image quality score per segment was 3.5 (IQR: 3.0-4.0) in standard CCTA vs. 3.5 (IQR: 2.5-4.0) in ultra-low dose with MBIR (P = 0.29). Diagnostic image quality (scores 2-4) was found in 98.7 vs. 97.8% coronary segments (P = 0.36). Introduction of MBIR for ultra-low-dose CCTA resulted in a significant increase in SNR (P < 0.001) for LMA (from 15 ± 5 to 29 ± 7) and RCA (from 14 ± 4 to 27 ± 6) despite 82% dose reduction.
CONCLUSION: Coronary computed tomography angiography acquisition with diagnostic image quality is feasible at an ultra-low radiation dose of 0.21 mSv, e.g. in the range reported for a postero-anterior and lateral chest X-ray.

Statistics

Citations

42 citations in Web of Science®
46 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:27 Feb 2014 13:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:42
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0195-668X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehu053
PubMed ID:24553723

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher