Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Risks of inflammatory bowel disease treatment with glucocorticosteroids and aminosalicylates


Curkovic, Ivanka; Egbring, Marco; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A (2013). Risks of inflammatory bowel disease treatment with glucocorticosteroids and aminosalicylates. Digestive Diseases, 31(3-4):368-373.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Glucocorticosteroids and aminosalicylates, mainly mesalazine (5-ASA), are both standard therapeutics in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The glucocorticosteroids are highly effective in inducing remission in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, but their use is limited by the high incidence and the potentially serious nature of adverse events. In an attempt to limit systemic side effects, rapidly metabolized corticosteroids such as budesonide have been introduced. The safety profile of aminosalicylates differs between the formulations.
METHODS: We summarize the potential risks associated with glucocorticosteroid and aminosalicylate therapy in IBDs.
RESULTS: The numerous adverse events of glucocorticosteroids, particularly at high doses and prolonged treatment, include opportunistic infections, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ocular effects (glaucoma and cataracts), psychiatric complications, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression and increased fracture risk. Partially, these systemic adverse events occur with budesonide, which only has a low systemic exposure. The safety profile of 5-ASA is comparable to placebo and superior to the old aminosalicylate prodrug sulfasalazine, which had a significantly higher incidence of intolerance reactions including allergic rashes. Only in rare cases has nephrotoxicity such as interstitial nephritis been associated with 5-ASA.
CONCLUSION: Considering the toxicity profile of conventional glucocorticosteroids, one primary goal of treatment in IBD should be corticosteroid-free remission. Therapy with budesonide may result in a better safety profile. 5-ASA treatment is usually well tolerated, but with regard to the rare nephrotoxic events, it is advisable to assess renal function before and during treatment with 5-ASA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Glucocorticosteroids and aminosalicylates, mainly mesalazine (5-ASA), are both standard therapeutics in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The glucocorticosteroids are highly effective in inducing remission in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, but their use is limited by the high incidence and the potentially serious nature of adverse events. In an attempt to limit systemic side effects, rapidly metabolized corticosteroids such as budesonide have been introduced. The safety profile of aminosalicylates differs between the formulations.
METHODS: We summarize the potential risks associated with glucocorticosteroid and aminosalicylate therapy in IBDs.
RESULTS: The numerous adverse events of glucocorticosteroids, particularly at high doses and prolonged treatment, include opportunistic infections, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ocular effects (glaucoma and cataracts), psychiatric complications, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression and increased fracture risk. Partially, these systemic adverse events occur with budesonide, which only has a low systemic exposure. The safety profile of 5-ASA is comparable to placebo and superior to the old aminosalicylate prodrug sulfasalazine, which had a significantly higher incidence of intolerance reactions including allergic rashes. Only in rare cases has nephrotoxicity such as interstitial nephritis been associated with 5-ASA.
CONCLUSION: Considering the toxicity profile of conventional glucocorticosteroids, one primary goal of treatment in IBD should be corticosteroid-free remission. Therapy with budesonide may result in a better safety profile. 5-ASA treatment is usually well tolerated, but with regard to the rare nephrotoxic events, it is advisable to assess renal function before and during treatment with 5-ASA.

Statistics

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

17 downloads since deposited on 26 Feb 2014
11 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:26 Feb 2014 12:40
Last Modified:08 Jun 2016 13:48
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0257-2753
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000354699
PubMed ID:24246990

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 983kB
View at publisher