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DSM-5 Kommentar: Zwangsstörungen im DSM-5


Walitza, Susanne (2014). DSM-5 Kommentar: Zwangsstörungen im DSM-5. Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie, 42(2):121-127.

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive disorders are a frequent and debilitating condition also in children and adolescents. The present paper summarizes the changes in the DSM diagnostic criteria between the IV-TR edition and the DSM-5 edition, and evaluates them critically. A central feature is the revision of the category to which these disorders belong: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders are no longer considered to be anxiety disorders, but rather now comprise an independent category encompassing a broader spectrum of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Minor changes have been made to the description of the criteria, and there is a new emphasis on the clinical assessment of the patient's insight level (good, poor, absent). Obsessive-compulsive disorders associated with tic disorders are classified as a separate subtype. The present paper discusses these changes on the basis of the available studies and literature, and then looks ahead to the implementation of the new criteria in the everyday clinical setting and in research.

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive disorders are a frequent and debilitating condition also in children and adolescents. The present paper summarizes the changes in the DSM diagnostic criteria between the IV-TR edition and the DSM-5 edition, and evaluates them critically. A central feature is the revision of the category to which these disorders belong: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders are no longer considered to be anxiety disorders, but rather now comprise an independent category encompassing a broader spectrum of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Minor changes have been made to the description of the criteria, and there is a new emphasis on the clinical assessment of the patient's insight level (good, poor, absent). Obsessive-compulsive disorders associated with tic disorders are classified as a separate subtype. The present paper discusses these changes on the basis of the available studies and literature, and then looks ahead to the implementation of the new criteria in the everyday clinical setting and in research.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2014
Deposited On:07 Mar 2014 16:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:44
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1422-4917
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1422-4917/a000279
PubMed ID:24571818

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