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Measuring cerebrovascular reactivity: what stimulus to use?


Fierstra, J; Sobczyk, O; Battisti-Charbonney, A; Mandell, D M; Poublanc, J; Crawley, A P; Mikulis, D J; Duffin, J; Fisher, J A (2013). Measuring cerebrovascular reactivity: what stimulus to use? Journal of Physiology, 591(Pt 23):5809-5821.

Abstract

Cerebrovascular reactivity is the change in cerebral blood flow in response to a vasodilatory or vasoconstrictive stimulus. Measuring variations of cerebrovascular reactivity between different regions of the brain has the potential to not only advance understanding of how the cerebral vasculature controls the distribution of blood flow but also to detect cerebrovascular pathophysiology. While there are standardized and repeatable methods for estimating the changes in cerebral blood flow in response to a vasoactive stimulus, the same cannot be said for the stimulus itself. Indeed, the wide variety of vasoactive challenges currently employed in these studies impedes comparisons between them. This review therefore critically examines the vasoactive stimuli in current use for their ability to provide a standard repeatable challenge and for the practicality of their implementation. Such challenges include induced reductions in systemic blood pressure, and the administration of vasoactive substances such as acetazolamide and carbon dioxide. We conclude that many of the stimuli in current use do not provide a standard stimulus comparable between individuals and in the same individual over time. We suggest that carbon dioxide is the most suitable vasoactive stimulus. We describe recently developed computer-controlled MRI compatible gas delivery systems which are capable of administering reliable and repeatable vasoactive CO2 stimuli.

Abstract

Cerebrovascular reactivity is the change in cerebral blood flow in response to a vasodilatory or vasoconstrictive stimulus. Measuring variations of cerebrovascular reactivity between different regions of the brain has the potential to not only advance understanding of how the cerebral vasculature controls the distribution of blood flow but also to detect cerebrovascular pathophysiology. While there are standardized and repeatable methods for estimating the changes in cerebral blood flow in response to a vasoactive stimulus, the same cannot be said for the stimulus itself. Indeed, the wide variety of vasoactive challenges currently employed in these studies impedes comparisons between them. This review therefore critically examines the vasoactive stimuli in current use for their ability to provide a standard repeatable challenge and for the practicality of their implementation. Such challenges include induced reductions in systemic blood pressure, and the administration of vasoactive substances such as acetazolamide and carbon dioxide. We conclude that many of the stimuli in current use do not provide a standard stimulus comparable between individuals and in the same individual over time. We suggest that carbon dioxide is the most suitable vasoactive stimulus. We describe recently developed computer-controlled MRI compatible gas delivery systems which are capable of administering reliable and repeatable vasoactive CO2 stimuli.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Mar 2014 14:22
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 16:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-3751
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2013.259150
PubMed ID:24081155

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