Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Revisiting the most informed consumer of surgical services. The physician-patient


Domenighetti, Gianfranco; Casabianca, Antoine; Gutzwiller, Felix; Martinoli, Sebastiano (1993). Revisiting the most informed consumer of surgical services. The physician-patient. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 9(4):505-513.

Abstract

Little is known about the consumption of medical and surgical services by the most informed consumer in the health care market: the physician-patient. Such knowledge should be important for the understanding of the role of information on consumption, supplier-induced demand, the doctor-patient relationship, unnecessary medical services, and the adequacy of professional practices to the renal health needs of the "ordinary patient." We measured by questionnaire the standardized consumption of seven common surgical procedures. Except for appendectomy, the age- and sex-standardized consumption for each of the common surgical procedures was always significantly higher in the general population than for the "gold standard" of physician-patients. The data suggest that (a) contrary to prior research, doctors have much lower rates of surgery than does the general population; and (b) in a fee-for-services health care market without financial barriers to medical care, less-informed patients are greater consumers of common surgical procedures.

Abstract

Little is known about the consumption of medical and surgical services by the most informed consumer in the health care market: the physician-patient. Such knowledge should be important for the understanding of the role of information on consumption, supplier-induced demand, the doctor-patient relationship, unnecessary medical services, and the adequacy of professional practices to the renal health needs of the "ordinary patient." We measured by questionnaire the standardized consumption of seven common surgical procedures. Except for appendectomy, the age- and sex-standardized consumption for each of the common surgical procedures was always significantly higher in the general population than for the "gold standard" of physician-patients. The data suggest that (a) contrary to prior research, doctors have much lower rates of surgery than does the general population; and (b) in a fee-for-services health care market without financial barriers to medical care, less-informed patients are greater consumers of common surgical procedures.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1993
Deposited On:24 Mar 2014 13:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:44
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0266-4623
PubMed ID:8288426

Download

Full text not available from this repository.