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Beyond monitoring: After-effects of responding to prospective memory targets


Meier, Beat; Rey-Mermet, Alodie (2012). Beyond monitoring: After-effects of responding to prospective memory targets. Consciousness and Cognition, 21(4):1644-1653.

Abstract

Responding to bivalent stimuli (i.e., stimuli with features relevant for different tasks) slows subsequent performance. In prospective memory research, prospective memory targets can be considered as bivalent stimuli because they typically involve features relevant for both the prospective memory task and the ongoing task. The purpose of this study was to investigate how responding to a prospective memory target slows subsequent performance. In two experiments, we embedded the prospective memory task in a task-switching paradigm and we manipulated the degree of task-set overlap between the prospective memory task and the ongoing task. The results showed consistent after-effects of responding to prospective memory targets. The specific trajectory of the slowing depended on the amount of task-set overlap. These results demonstrate that responding to prospective memory targets results in after-effects, a so far neglected cost on ongoing task performance.

Abstract

Responding to bivalent stimuli (i.e., stimuli with features relevant for different tasks) slows subsequent performance. In prospective memory research, prospective memory targets can be considered as bivalent stimuli because they typically involve features relevant for both the prospective memory task and the ongoing task. The purpose of this study was to investigate how responding to a prospective memory target slows subsequent performance. In two experiments, we embedded the prospective memory task in a task-switching paradigm and we manipulated the degree of task-set overlap between the prospective memory task and the ongoing task. The results showed consistent after-effects of responding to prospective memory targets. The specific trajectory of the slowing depended on the amount of task-set overlap. These results demonstrate that responding to prospective memory targets results in after-effects, a so far neglected cost on ongoing task performance.

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24 citations in Web of Science®
25 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:05 Mar 2014 16:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8100
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2012.09.003

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