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A field test of the quiet hour as a time management technique


König, Cornelius J; Kleinmann, Martin; Höhmann, Wilfried (2013). A field test of the quiet hour as a time management technique. European Review of Applied Psychology/ Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée, 63(3):137-145.

Abstract

Introduction: This field study tested the effectiveness of quiet hours (an hour free of any phone calls, visitors or incoming emails). Objective: Based on interruptions research and on a behavioral decision-making approach to time management, we argue that establishing quiet hours is a precommitment strategy against predominantly harmful interruptions. Furthermore, conscientiousness and the use of other time management techniques should moderate the effects of the quiet hour. Method: We tested this by using a two-week experimental diary study with managers as participants. Results: Multi-level analyses showed that a quiet hour improved the performance on a task worked on during the quiet hour in comparison to a similar task on a day without a quiet hour. Furthermore, overall performance was higher on days with a quiet hour than on days without one. Conscientiousness acted as a moderator, unlike the use of other time management techniques. Conclusion: These results imply that more people should consider implementing a quiet hour, especially if they are non-conscientious.

Abstract

Introduction: This field study tested the effectiveness of quiet hours (an hour free of any phone calls, visitors or incoming emails). Objective: Based on interruptions research and on a behavioral decision-making approach to time management, we argue that establishing quiet hours is a precommitment strategy against predominantly harmful interruptions. Furthermore, conscientiousness and the use of other time management techniques should moderate the effects of the quiet hour. Method: We tested this by using a two-week experimental diary study with managers as participants. Results: Multi-level analyses showed that a quiet hour improved the performance on a task worked on during the quiet hour in comparison to a similar task on a day without a quiet hour. Furthermore, overall performance was higher on days with a quiet hour than on days without one. Conscientiousness acted as a moderator, unlike the use of other time management techniques. Conclusion: These results imply that more people should consider implementing a quiet hour, especially if they are non-conscientious.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Mar 2014 13:21
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 04:45
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1162-9088
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erap.2012.12.003

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