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Light curing time reduction: in vitro evaluation of new intensive light-emitting diode curing units


Mavropoulos, A; Staudt, C B; Kiliaridis, S; Krejci, I (2005). Light curing time reduction: in vitro evaluation of new intensive light-emitting diode curing units. European Journal of Orthodontics, 27(4):408-412.

Abstract

The aim of the present in vitro study was to establish the minimum necessary curing time to bond stainless steel brackets (Mini Diamond Twin) using new, intensive, light-emitting diode (LED) curing units. Seventy-five bovine primary incisors were divided into five equal groups. A standard light curing adhesive (Transbond XT) was used to bond the stainless steel brackets using different lamps and curing times. Two groups were bonded using an intensive LED curing lamp (Ortholux LED) for 5 and 10 seconds. Two more groups were bonded using another intensive LED curing device (Ultra-Lume LED 5) also for 5 and 10 seconds. Finally, a high-output halogen lamp (Optilux 501) was used for 40 seconds to bond the final group, which served as a positive control. All teeth were fixed in hard acrylic and stored for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using an Instron testing machine. Weibull distribution and analysis of variance were used to test for significant differences. The SBS values obtained were significantly different between groups (P < 0.001). When used for 10 seconds, the intensive LED curing units achieved sufficient SBS, comparable with the control. In contrast, 5 seconds resulted in significantly lower SBS. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was not significantly affected.A curing time of 10 seconds was found to be sufficient to bond metallic brackets to incisors using intensive LED curing units. These new, comparatively inexpensive, curing lamps seem to be an advantageous alternative to conventional halogen lamps for bonding orthodontic brackets.

Abstract

The aim of the present in vitro study was to establish the minimum necessary curing time to bond stainless steel brackets (Mini Diamond Twin) using new, intensive, light-emitting diode (LED) curing units. Seventy-five bovine primary incisors were divided into five equal groups. A standard light curing adhesive (Transbond XT) was used to bond the stainless steel brackets using different lamps and curing times. Two groups were bonded using an intensive LED curing lamp (Ortholux LED) for 5 and 10 seconds. Two more groups were bonded using another intensive LED curing device (Ultra-Lume LED 5) also for 5 and 10 seconds. Finally, a high-output halogen lamp (Optilux 501) was used for 40 seconds to bond the final group, which served as a positive control. All teeth were fixed in hard acrylic and stored for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using an Instron testing machine. Weibull distribution and analysis of variance were used to test for significant differences. The SBS values obtained were significantly different between groups (P < 0.001). When used for 10 seconds, the intensive LED curing units achieved sufficient SBS, comparable with the control. In contrast, 5 seconds resulted in significantly lower SBS. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was not significantly affected.A curing time of 10 seconds was found to be sufficient to bond metallic brackets to incisors using intensive LED curing units. These new, comparatively inexpensive, curing lamps seem to be an advantageous alternative to conventional halogen lamps for bonding orthodontic brackets.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:18 Mar 2014 14:09
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 04:50
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0141-5387
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ejo/cji021
PubMed ID:15961571

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