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Audio and chat combined - are two media better than one?


Löber, A; Schwabe, G (2008). Audio and chat combined - are two media better than one? In: 16th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2008), Galway, Ireland, 9 June 2008 - 11 June 2008.

Abstract

Meetings and collaborative work are part of the everyday business life. Audio communication in the form of VoIP and instant messaging-based chat communication offer new and inexpensive ways to communicate in groups. Our previous research has shown that the selection of either audio or chat has a significant impact on the collaborative productivity. This experiment observes the impact of
selecting both audio and chat communication at the same time. We analyze whether the polychronicity helps to achieve a higher productivity. This work provides quantitative, experimental-based data. We show with this data that typical users are overwhelmed by the combination of both media. The complexity of listening to the audio conversation, reading the chat dialog and observing the shared whitespace together with communicating seems to induce too high a cognitive load on the user, thus
preventing productive work. This paper shows the importance of quantitative experiments about polychronicity and proposes further work about the correlation of media synchronicity and polychronicity research.

Abstract

Meetings and collaborative work are part of the everyday business life. Audio communication in the form of VoIP and instant messaging-based chat communication offer new and inexpensive ways to communicate in groups. Our previous research has shown that the selection of either audio or chat has a significant impact on the collaborative productivity. This experiment observes the impact of
selecting both audio and chat communication at the same time. We analyze whether the polychronicity helps to achieve a higher productivity. This work provides quantitative, experimental-based data. We show with this data that typical users are overwhelmed by the combination of both media. The complexity of listening to the audio conversation, reading the chat dialog and observing the shared whitespace together with communicating seems to induce too high a cognitive load on the user, thus
preventing productive work. This paper shows the importance of quantitative experiments about polychronicity and proposes further work about the correlation of media synchronicity and polychronicity research.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:11 June 2008
Deposited On:09 Jan 2009 16:26
Last Modified:10 Aug 2017 18:56
ISBN:978-0-9553159-2-3
Additional Information:The paper is published on the Proceedings CD: Golden W, Acton T, Conboy K, van der Heijden H, Tuunainen V (Eds.), 16th European Conference on Information Systems, Galway, Ireland, June 9-11 2008, CD-ROM.
Official URL:http://www.ifi.uzh.ch/pax/web/index.php/publication/show/id/847
Related URLs:http://www.ecis2008.ie/

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