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Alcohol as a risk factor for global burden of disease


Rehm, Jürgen; Room, R; Monteiro, M; Gmel, Gerhard; Graham, K; Rehn, N; Sempos, C T; Jernigan, D (2003). Alcohol as a risk factor for global burden of disease. European Addiction Research, 9(4):157-164.

Abstract

Aim: To make quantitative estimates of the burden of disease attributable to alcohol in the year 2000 on a global basis. Design: Secondary data analysis. Measurements: Two dimensions of alcohol exposure were included: average volume of alcohol consumption and patterns of drinking. There were also two main outcome measures: mortality, i.e. the number of deaths, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), i.e. the number of years of life lost to premature mortality or to disability. All estimates were prepared separately by sex, age group and WHO region. Findings: Alcohol causes a considerable disease burden: 3.2% of the global deaths and 4.0% of the global DALYs in the year 2000 could be attributed to this exposure. There were marked differences by sex and region for both outcomes. In addition, there were differences by disease category and type of outcome; in particular, unintentional injuries contributed most to alcohol-attributable mortality burden while neuropsychiatric diseases contributed most to alcohol-attributable disease burden. Discussion/Conclusions: The underlying assumptions are discussed and reasons are given as to why the estimates should still be considered conservative despite the considerable burden attributable to alcohol globally.

Abstract

Aim: To make quantitative estimates of the burden of disease attributable to alcohol in the year 2000 on a global basis. Design: Secondary data analysis. Measurements: Two dimensions of alcohol exposure were included: average volume of alcohol consumption and patterns of drinking. There were also two main outcome measures: mortality, i.e. the number of deaths, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), i.e. the number of years of life lost to premature mortality or to disability. All estimates were prepared separately by sex, age group and WHO region. Findings: Alcohol causes a considerable disease burden: 3.2% of the global deaths and 4.0% of the global DALYs in the year 2000 could be attributed to this exposure. There were marked differences by sex and region for both outcomes. In addition, there were differences by disease category and type of outcome; in particular, unintentional injuries contributed most to alcohol-attributable mortality burden while neuropsychiatric diseases contributed most to alcohol-attributable disease burden. Discussion/Conclusions: The underlying assumptions are discussed and reasons are given as to why the estimates should still be considered conservative despite the considerable burden attributable to alcohol globally.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Disease;Risk
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:16 Apr 2014 14:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:47
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1022-6877
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000072222

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