Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

North American Glyptodontines (Xenarthra, Mammalia) in the Upper Pleistocene of northern South America


Carlini, A A; Zurita, A E; Aguilera, O (2008). North American Glyptodontines (Xenarthra, Mammalia) in the Upper Pleistocene of northern South America. Paläontologische Zeitschrift, 82(2):125-138.

Abstract

The Glyptodontidae is one of the most conspicuous groups in the Pleistocene megafauna of the Americas. The Glyptodontinae were involved in the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) and their earliest records in North America are about 3.9 Ma, suggesting an earlier formation of the Panamanian landbridge. Taxonomically it is possible to recognize two Pleistocene genera of Glyptodontinae:Glyptodon (ca. 1.8 – 0.008 Ma), restricted to South America, andGlyptotherium (ca. 2.6 – 0.009 Ma), including records in both North and Central America. Here we present the first report of the genusGlyptotherium in South America, from the Late Pleistocene of several fossil localities in Falcón State, northwestern Venezuela. A comparative analysis of the material, represented by cranial and postcranial parts, including the dorsal carapace and caudal rings, suggests a close affinity withGlyptotherium cylindricum (Late Pleistocene of Central Mexico). This occurrence in the latest Pleistocene of the northernmost region of South America Supports the bidirectional faunal migration during the GABI and the repeated re-immigration from North America of South American clades, as has been reported in other members of the Cingulata (e.g., Pampatheriidae).

Abstract

The Glyptodontidae is one of the most conspicuous groups in the Pleistocene megafauna of the Americas. The Glyptodontinae were involved in the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) and their earliest records in North America are about 3.9 Ma, suggesting an earlier formation of the Panamanian landbridge. Taxonomically it is possible to recognize two Pleistocene genera of Glyptodontinae:Glyptodon (ca. 1.8 – 0.008 Ma), restricted to South America, andGlyptotherium (ca. 2.6 – 0.009 Ma), including records in both North and Central America. Here we present the first report of the genusGlyptotherium in South America, from the Late Pleistocene of several fossil localities in Falcón State, northwestern Venezuela. A comparative analysis of the material, represented by cranial and postcranial parts, including the dorsal carapace and caudal rings, suggests a close affinity withGlyptotherium cylindricum (Late Pleistocene of Central Mexico). This occurrence in the latest Pleistocene of the northernmost region of South America Supports the bidirectional faunal migration during the GABI and the repeated re-immigration from North America of South American clades, as has been reported in other members of the Cingulata (e.g., Pampatheriidae).

Statistics

Citations

33 citations in Web of Science®
38 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Uncontrolled Keywords:Glyptodontidae - Glyptotherium - Pleistocene - South America - Venezuela - Paleobiogeography - Great American Biotic Interchange
Language:English
Date:June 2008
Deposited On:05 Feb 2009 15:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:47
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0031-0220
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02988404
Official URL:http://www.springerlink.com/content/432kv0mw28101757/?p=d5d5c9100b9e4340bd2c29c228c49c68&pi=3

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations