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More is not less: Greater information quantity does not diminish liking


Ullrich, Johannes; Krueger, Joachim I; Brod, Anna; Groschupf, Fabian (2013). More is not less: Greater information quantity does not diminish liking. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105(6):909-920.

Abstract

How does the acquisition of information about a person affect the liking of that person? A recent set of studies suggests that liking decreases as people acquire more information (Norton, Frost, & Ariely, 2007). We test this “less-is-more” hypothesis along with an alternative hypothesis based on information integration theory. According to this alternative, people average available person information in an unbiased manner so that the liking of a person described by a random sample of any number of traits from a trait universe approximates the degree of liking that would be obtained if all trait information were known. The correlation between liking and the number of traits should be zero. We present the results of computer simulation and 2 empirical person-judgment studies. Using Bayesian analyses, we find that the evidence is more consistent with the information-integration hypothesis than with the “less-is-more” hypothesis.

Abstract

How does the acquisition of information about a person affect the liking of that person? A recent set of studies suggests that liking decreases as people acquire more information (Norton, Frost, & Ariely, 2007). We test this “less-is-more” hypothesis along with an alternative hypothesis based on information integration theory. According to this alternative, people average available person information in an unbiased manner so that the liking of a person described by a random sample of any number of traits from a trait universe approximates the degree of liking that would be obtained if all trait information were known. The correlation between liking and the number of traits should be zero. We present the results of computer simulation and 2 empirical person-judgment studies. Using Bayesian analyses, we find that the evidence is more consistent with the information-integration hypothesis than with the “less-is-more” hypothesis.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:01 Apr 2014 13:24
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 05:05
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0022-3514
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0033183

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