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Are values in the Benelux countries comparable? Testing for equivalence with the European Social Survey


Davidov, Eldad; Schmidt, Peter (2007). Are values in the Benelux countries comparable? Testing for equivalence with the European Social Survey. In: Loosveldt, G; Swyngedouw, M; Cambré, B. Measuring Meaningful Data in Social Research. Leuven: Acco, 373-386.

Abstract

Benelux is an economic union in Europe comprising three neighbouring countries, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. It was created for the Benelux Customs Union, and was replaced by an economic union, which is still existent. Dutch and French are the commonly used languages in these countries. Out of the total of 27.2 million people living in the member states 4.7 million (17 percent) speak French and 22.5 million (83 percent) speak Dutch. Although it is not an official language of the Benelux, Belgium and Luxembourg recognise German as one of the official national languages. This union, its economic activities and the common languages reflect a shared cultural, economic, social and political background. But do these countries also share common values? In the following chapter we are going to apply one of the currently mostly used value theory in the social sciences, the human basic values theory (Schwartz, 1992), in order to try to answer this question. More precisely, we are going to try to answer the following questions: (1) Do values as proposed by Schwartz (1992) and as measured in the European Social Survey (ESS) in the second round (2004-2005) exhibit the necessary statistical conditions of invariance, which allow comparing them across the three nations?; (2) If the answer to this question is positive, to what extent does the importance attributed to these values differ across the three countries?1 The second round of the ESS provides us with an opportunity to conduct this test across the three countries. The cross-country comparability of the value measurements in this round has not been evaluated yet. Davidov, Schmidt and Schwartz (in press) conducted an invariance test of the values scale across 20 countries with the first round of the ESS, but it did not include Luxemburg, as Luxemburg did not collect data on values on that round2. We are going to start with a short presentation of the theory. Then we will provide a description of the items used in the European Social Survey to measure these values. We will proceed with statistical analyses of invariance, which is a necessary condition for comparability of constructs across cultures or groups. Finding out invariance of some values will allow us to compare only these values across the three countries. After providing results of our analyses we will finalize with some concluding remarks.

Abstract

Benelux is an economic union in Europe comprising three neighbouring countries, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. It was created for the Benelux Customs Union, and was replaced by an economic union, which is still existent. Dutch and French are the commonly used languages in these countries. Out of the total of 27.2 million people living in the member states 4.7 million (17 percent) speak French and 22.5 million (83 percent) speak Dutch. Although it is not an official language of the Benelux, Belgium and Luxembourg recognise German as one of the official national languages. This union, its economic activities and the common languages reflect a shared cultural, economic, social and political background. But do these countries also share common values? In the following chapter we are going to apply one of the currently mostly used value theory in the social sciences, the human basic values theory (Schwartz, 1992), in order to try to answer this question. More precisely, we are going to try to answer the following questions: (1) Do values as proposed by Schwartz (1992) and as measured in the European Social Survey (ESS) in the second round (2004-2005) exhibit the necessary statistical conditions of invariance, which allow comparing them across the three nations?; (2) If the answer to this question is positive, to what extent does the importance attributed to these values differ across the three countries?1 The second round of the ESS provides us with an opportunity to conduct this test across the three countries. The cross-country comparability of the value measurements in this round has not been evaluated yet. Davidov, Schmidt and Schwartz (in press) conducted an invariance test of the values scale across 20 countries with the first round of the ESS, but it did not include Luxemburg, as Luxemburg did not collect data on values on that round2. We are going to start with a short presentation of the theory. Then we will provide a description of the items used in the European Social Survey to measure these values. We will proceed with statistical analyses of invariance, which is a necessary condition for comparability of constructs across cultures or groups. Finding out invariance of some values will allow us to compare only these values across the three countries. After providing results of our analyses we will finalize with some concluding remarks.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:29 Apr 2014 13:09
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 05:19
Publisher:Acco
ISBN:978-90-334-6829-2
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/zbz/action/display.do?fn=display&vid=ZAD&doc=ebi01_prod009482107 (Library Catalogue)

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