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Comparing injecting and non-injecting illicit opioid users in a multi-site Canadian sample (OPICAN cohort)


Fischer, B; Manzoni, P; Rehm, Jürgen (2006). Comparing injecting and non-injecting illicit opioid users in a multi-site Canadian sample (OPICAN cohort). European Addiction Research, 12(4):230-239.

Abstract

Illicit opioid use in Canada and elsewhere increasingly involves a variety of opioids and non-injection routes of administration. Injection and non-injection opioid users tend to differ in various key characteristics. From a public health perspective, non-injection routes of opioid use tend to be less harmful due to lesser morbidity and mortality risks. Our study compared current injectors (80%) and non-injectors (20%) in a multi-site sample of regular illicit opioid users from across Canada ('OPICAN' study). In bivariate analysis, injectors and non-injectors differed by prevalence in social and health characteristics as well as drug use. Logistic regression analysis identified city, drug use, housing status and mental health problems as independent predictors of injection status. Further analysis revealed that the majority of current non-injectors had an injection history. Our results reinforce the need to explore potential interventions aimed at preventing the transition from non-injectors to injecting, or facilitating the transition of injectors to non-injecting, as initiated in several other contexts.

Abstract

Illicit opioid use in Canada and elsewhere increasingly involves a variety of opioids and non-injection routes of administration. Injection and non-injection opioid users tend to differ in various key characteristics. From a public health perspective, non-injection routes of opioid use tend to be less harmful due to lesser morbidity and mortality risks. Our study compared current injectors (80%) and non-injectors (20%) in a multi-site sample of regular illicit opioid users from across Canada ('OPICAN' study). In bivariate analysis, injectors and non-injectors differed by prevalence in social and health characteristics as well as drug use. Logistic regression analysis identified city, drug use, housing status and mental health problems as independent predictors of injection status. Further analysis revealed that the majority of current non-injectors had an injection history. Our results reinforce the need to explore potential interventions aimed at preventing the transition from non-injectors to injecting, or facilitating the transition of injectors to non-injecting, as initiated in several other contexts.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:opioid
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:20 May 2014 12:04
Last Modified:07 Jul 2016 10:32
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1022-6877
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000094425
PubMed ID:16968998

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