Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Design of broadband RF pulses with polynomial-phase response


Schulte, R F; Henning, A; Tsao, J; Boesiger, P; Pruessmann, K P (2007). Design of broadband RF pulses with polynomial-phase response. Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 186(2):167-175.

Abstract

The achievable bandwidth of common linear-phase RF pulses is limited by the maximum feasible B1 amplitude of the MR system. It has been shown previously, that this limitation can be circumvented by overlaying a quadratic phase in the frequency domain, which spreads the power across the pulse duration. Quadratic-phase RF pulses are near optimal in terms of achieving minimal B1max. In this work, it is demonstrated that further B1max reduction can be achieved by combining quadratic with higher-order polynomial-phase functions. RF pulses with a phase response up to tenth order were designed using the Shinnar-Le Roux transformation, yielding considerable increases in bandwidth and selectivity as compared to pure quadratic-phase pulses. These benefits are studied for a range of pulse specifications and demonstrated experimentally. For B1max = 20 microT and a pulse duration of 2.1 ms, it was possible to increase the bandwidth from 3.1 kHz for linear and 3.8 kHz for a quadratic to 9.9 kHz for a polynomial-phase pulse.

Abstract

The achievable bandwidth of common linear-phase RF pulses is limited by the maximum feasible B1 amplitude of the MR system. It has been shown previously, that this limitation can be circumvented by overlaying a quadratic phase in the frequency domain, which spreads the power across the pulse duration. Quadratic-phase RF pulses are near optimal in terms of achieving minimal B1max. In this work, it is demonstrated that further B1max reduction can be achieved by combining quadratic with higher-order polynomial-phase functions. RF pulses with a phase response up to tenth order were designed using the Shinnar-Le Roux transformation, yielding considerable increases in bandwidth and selectivity as compared to pure quadratic-phase pulses. These benefits are studied for a range of pulse specifications and demonstrated experimentally. For B1max = 20 microT and a pulse duration of 2.1 ms, it was possible to increase the bandwidth from 3.1 kHz for linear and 3.8 kHz for a quadratic to 9.9 kHz for a polynomial-phase pulse.

Statistics

Citations

27 citations in Web of Science®
26 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:21 May 2014 07:05
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 05:31
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-7807
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmr.2007.02.004
PubMed ID:17331765

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher