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Safety evaluation of large external fixation clamps and frames in a magnetic resonance environment


Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Disegi, John A (2007). Safety evaluation of large external fixation clamps and frames in a magnetic resonance environment. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B, 82B(1):17-22.

Abstract

Large orthopedic external fixation clamps and related components were evaluated for force, torque, and heating response when subjected to the strong electromagnetic fields of magnetic-resonance (MR) imaging devices. Forces induced by a 3-Tesla (T) MR scanner were compiled for newly designed nonmagnetic clamps and older clamps that contained ferromagnetic components. Heating trials were performed in a 1.5 and in a 3 T MR scanner with two assembled external fixation frames. Forces of the newly designed clamps were more than a factor 2 lower as the gravitational force on the device whereas, magnetic forces on the older devices showed over 10 times the force induced by earth acceleration of gravity. No torque effects could be found for the newly designed clamps. Temperature measurements at the tips of Schanz screws in the 1.5 T MR scanner showed a rise of 0.7 degrees C for a pelvic frame and of 2.1 degrees C for a diamond knee bridge frame when normalized to a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. The normalized temperature increases in the 3 T MR scanner were 0.9 degrees C for the pelvic frame and 1.1 degrees C for the knee bridge frame. Large external fixation frames assembled with the newly designed clamps (390 Series Clamps), carbon fiber reinforced rods, and implant quality 316L stainless steel Schanz screws met prevailing force and torque limits when tested in a 3-T field, and demonstrated temperature increase that met IEC-60601 guidelines for extremities. The influence of frame-induced eddy currents on the risk of peripheral nerve stimulation was not investigated.

Abstract

Large orthopedic external fixation clamps and related components were evaluated for force, torque, and heating response when subjected to the strong electromagnetic fields of magnetic-resonance (MR) imaging devices. Forces induced by a 3-Tesla (T) MR scanner were compiled for newly designed nonmagnetic clamps and older clamps that contained ferromagnetic components. Heating trials were performed in a 1.5 and in a 3 T MR scanner with two assembled external fixation frames. Forces of the newly designed clamps were more than a factor 2 lower as the gravitational force on the device whereas, magnetic forces on the older devices showed over 10 times the force induced by earth acceleration of gravity. No torque effects could be found for the newly designed clamps. Temperature measurements at the tips of Schanz screws in the 1.5 T MR scanner showed a rise of 0.7 degrees C for a pelvic frame and of 2.1 degrees C for a diamond knee bridge frame when normalized to a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. The normalized temperature increases in the 3 T MR scanner were 0.9 degrees C for the pelvic frame and 1.1 degrees C for the knee bridge frame. Large external fixation frames assembled with the newly designed clamps (390 Series Clamps), carbon fiber reinforced rods, and implant quality 316L stainless steel Schanz screws met prevailing force and torque limits when tested in a 3-T field, and demonstrated temperature increase that met IEC-60601 guidelines for extremities. The influence of frame-induced eddy currents on the risk of peripheral nerve stimulation was not investigated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:21 May 2014 07:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:51
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1552-4973
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.30699
PubMed ID:17034016

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