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Statistical analysis of the angle of intrusion of porcine ventricular myocytes from epicardium to endocardium using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging


Schmid, Peter; Lunkenheimer, Paul P; Redmann, Klaus; Rothaus, Kai; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Cryer, Colin W; Jaermann, Thomas; Niederer, Peter; Boesiger, Peter; Anderson, Robert H (2007). Statistical analysis of the angle of intrusion of porcine ventricular myocytes from epicardium to endocardium using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The Anatomical Record, 290(11):1413-1423.

Abstract

Pairs of cylindrical knives were used to punch semicircular slices from the left basal, sub-basal, equatorial, and apical ventricular wall of porcine hearts. The sections extended from the epicardium to the endocardium. Their semicircular shape compensated for the depth-related changing orientation of the myocytes relative to the equatorial plane. The slices were analyzed by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The primary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor was determined in each pixel to calculate the number and angle of intrusion of the long axis of the aggregated myocytes relative to the epicardial surface. Arrays of axially sectioned aggregates were found in which 53% of the approximately two million segments evaluated intruded up to +/-15 degrees , 40% exhibited an angle of intrusion between +/-15 degrees and +/-45 degrees , and 7% exceeded an angle of +/-45 degrees , the positive sign thereby denoting an epi- to endocardial spiral in clockwise direction seen from the apex, while a negative sign denotes an anticlockwise spiral from the epicardium to the endocardium. In the basal and apical slices, the greater number of segments intruded in positive direction, while in the sub-basal and equatorial slices, negative angles of intrusion prevailed. The sampling of the primary eigenvectors was insensitive to postmortem decomposition of the tissue. In a previous histological study, we also documented the presence of large numbers of myocytes aggregated with their long axis intruding obliquely from the epicardial to the endocardial ventricular surfaces. We used magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging in this study to provide a comprehensive statistical analysis.

Abstract

Pairs of cylindrical knives were used to punch semicircular slices from the left basal, sub-basal, equatorial, and apical ventricular wall of porcine hearts. The sections extended from the epicardium to the endocardium. Their semicircular shape compensated for the depth-related changing orientation of the myocytes relative to the equatorial plane. The slices were analyzed by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The primary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor was determined in each pixel to calculate the number and angle of intrusion of the long axis of the aggregated myocytes relative to the epicardial surface. Arrays of axially sectioned aggregates were found in which 53% of the approximately two million segments evaluated intruded up to +/-15 degrees , 40% exhibited an angle of intrusion between +/-15 degrees and +/-45 degrees , and 7% exceeded an angle of +/-45 degrees , the positive sign thereby denoting an epi- to endocardial spiral in clockwise direction seen from the apex, while a negative sign denotes an anticlockwise spiral from the epicardium to the endocardium. In the basal and apical slices, the greater number of segments intruded in positive direction, while in the sub-basal and equatorial slices, negative angles of intrusion prevailed. The sampling of the primary eigenvectors was insensitive to postmortem decomposition of the tissue. In a previous histological study, we also documented the presence of large numbers of myocytes aggregated with their long axis intruding obliquely from the epicardial to the endocardial ventricular surfaces. We used magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging in this study to provide a comprehensive statistical analysis.

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17 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:21 May 2014 07:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:51
Publisher:John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN:1932-8486
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.20604
PubMed ID:17929275

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