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Avian luxations: occurrence, diagnosis and treatment


Azmanis, Panagiotis N; Wernick, Morena B; Hatt, Jean-Michel (2014). Avian luxations: occurrence, diagnosis and treatment. Veterinary Quarterly, 34(1):11-21.

Abstract

Whereas the treatment of fractures in birds has been a matter of multiple studies and reviews, comparatively little information is available for the treatment of luxations in birds. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the frequency, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of luxations in birds, aiming to guide the clinician in private practice as well as future research. The type, the localization, and the frequency of luxation do not follow a concrete pattern. In general, pet and aviary birds are more susceptible to leg and spinal luxations while in wild birds wing luxations are more frequently observed. Diagnosis is made on the basis of detailed orthopedic and radiographic examinations. Conservative management and coaptation has been successfully used in carpal, minor elbow, shoulder, coracoid, and metatarsophalangeal luxations. Surgical management is recommended in palatine bone, metacarpophalangeal, severe elbow, coxofemoral, stifle, and intertarsal joint luxations. The techniques, which have been applied, include arthrodesis, femoral head osteotomy, polymer rods, bone plates, and internal and external fixation in various combinations. Currently, there are no controlled studies, which underline the advantages and disadvantages of each technique.

Abstract

Whereas the treatment of fractures in birds has been a matter of multiple studies and reviews, comparatively little information is available for the treatment of luxations in birds. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the frequency, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of luxations in birds, aiming to guide the clinician in private practice as well as future research. The type, the localization, and the frequency of luxation do not follow a concrete pattern. In general, pet and aviary birds are more susceptible to leg and spinal luxations while in wild birds wing luxations are more frequently observed. Diagnosis is made on the basis of detailed orthopedic and radiographic examinations. Conservative management and coaptation has been successfully used in carpal, minor elbow, shoulder, coracoid, and metatarsophalangeal luxations. Surgical management is recommended in palatine bone, metacarpophalangeal, severe elbow, coxofemoral, stifle, and intertarsal joint luxations. The techniques, which have been applied, include arthrodesis, femoral head osteotomy, polymer rods, bone plates, and internal and external fixation in various combinations. Currently, there are no controlled studies, which underline the advantages and disadvantages of each technique.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:16 May 2014 15:49
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 05:37
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0165-2176
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/01652176.2014.905731
PubMed ID:24641357

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