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Applying 'Patient Blood Management' in the trauma center - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Theusinger, Oliver M; Stein, Philipp; Spahn, Donat R (2014). Applying 'Patient Blood Management' in the trauma center. Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology, 27(2):225-232.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to highlight the use of tranexamic acid, point-of-care testing, algorithm-based treatment of trauma-associated coagulopathy with factor concentrates to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in order to improve outcome. In addition, the management of patients on new oral anticoagulants, drugs with renewed interest and the tolerance of relatively low hemoglobin levels in the context of trauma will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Early administration of tranexamic acid reduces mortality without increasing the risk of thromboembolic events. Point-of-care testing is increasingly recommended. Goal-directed individualized coagulation algorithms with the use of factor concentrates allow reducing the amount of allogeneic blood products to be administered. Treatment of trauma patients with one of the new oral anticoagulants is challenging. Furthermore, new mechanisms have been discovered such as deep neuromuscular blockade to better tolerate acute anemia. SUMMARY: Applying Patient Blood Management concept to the trauma patient is possible and efficacious. Antihyperfibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid, point-of-care testing and coagulation algorithms with the use of factor concentrates allow a reduction of the number of transfusions, the costs and will likely ameliorate outcome of major trauma patients.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to highlight the use of tranexamic acid, point-of-care testing, algorithm-based treatment of trauma-associated coagulopathy with factor concentrates to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in order to improve outcome. In addition, the management of patients on new oral anticoagulants, drugs with renewed interest and the tolerance of relatively low hemoglobin levels in the context of trauma will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Early administration of tranexamic acid reduces mortality without increasing the risk of thromboembolic events. Point-of-care testing is increasingly recommended. Goal-directed individualized coagulation algorithms with the use of factor concentrates allow reducing the amount of allogeneic blood products to be administered. Treatment of trauma patients with one of the new oral anticoagulants is challenging. Furthermore, new mechanisms have been discovered such as deep neuromuscular blockade to better tolerate acute anemia. SUMMARY: Applying Patient Blood Management concept to the trauma patient is possible and efficacious. Antihyperfibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid, point-of-care testing and coagulation algorithms with the use of factor concentrates allow a reduction of the number of transfusions, the costs and will likely ameliorate outcome of major trauma patients.

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11 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:20 May 2014 13:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:52
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0952-7907
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/ACO.0000000000000041
PubMed ID:24378565

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