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Transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a low-incidence setting, Switzerland, 2006 to 2012


Somoskovi, A; Helbling, P; Deggim, V; Hömke, R; Ritter, C; Böttger, E C (2014). Transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a low-incidence setting, Switzerland, 2006 to 2012. Eurosurveillance, 19(11):4.

Abstract

The goal of the present study was to examine the transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Switzerland. Between 2006 and 2012, a total of 49 MDR-TB cases were reported to the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, 46 of which were of foreign origin. All 49 initial strains were evaluated by molecular epidemiologic methods at the Swiss National Reference Centre for Mycobacteria. In 43 strains, unique DNA fingerprint patterns were identified. Twelve strains were grouped into six clusters. Data from contact tracing suggest likely in-country transmission in four clusters, mostly among close contacts. In the remaining two clusters, no contact tracing data were available, but the identified genotypes were known to be prevalent in the countries of origin of the patients, suggesting the possibility that the infection was acquired there. While most MDR-TB cases are imported to Switzerland, at least four of the 49 MDR-TB cases were due to transmission within the country. The imported cases, however, did not lead to secondary cases outside the circles of close contacts. The results also indicate that prevention of MDR-TB transmission among immigrants may require closer monitoring.

Abstract

The goal of the present study was to examine the transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Switzerland. Between 2006 and 2012, a total of 49 MDR-TB cases were reported to the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, 46 of which were of foreign origin. All 49 initial strains were evaluated by molecular epidemiologic methods at the Swiss National Reference Centre for Mycobacteria. In 43 strains, unique DNA fingerprint patterns were identified. Twelve strains were grouped into six clusters. Data from contact tracing suggest likely in-country transmission in four clusters, mostly among close contacts. In the remaining two clusters, no contact tracing data were available, but the identified genotypes were known to be prevalent in the countries of origin of the patients, suggesting the possibility that the infection was acquired there. While most MDR-TB cases are imported to Switzerland, at least four of the 49 MDR-TB cases were due to transmission within the country. The imported cases, however, did not lead to secondary cases outside the circles of close contacts. The results also indicate that prevention of MDR-TB transmission among immigrants may require closer monitoring.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:20 May 2014 14:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:52
Publisher:Centre Europeen pour la Surveillance Epidemiologique du SIDA
ISSN:1025-496X
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20736
PubMed ID:24679721

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