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Laboratory diagnosis of ruminant abortion in Europe


Borel, N; Frey, C F; Gottstein, B; Hilbe, M; Pospischil, A; Franzoso, F D; Waldvogel, A (2014). Laboratory diagnosis of ruminant abortion in Europe. Veterinary Journal, 200(2):218-229.

Abstract

Abortion in ruminants is a major cause of economic loss worldwide, and the management and control of outbreaks is important in limiting their spread, and in preventing zoonotic infections. Given that rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis is central to controlling abortion outbreaks, the submission of tissue samples to laboratories offering the most appropriate tests is essential. Direct antigen and/or DNA detection methods are the currently preferred methods of reaching an aetiological diagnosis, and ideally these results are confirmed by the demonstration of corresponding macroscopic and/or histopathological lesions in the fetus and/or the placenta. However, the costs of laboratory examinations may be considerable and, even under optimal conditions, the percentage of aetiological diagnoses reached can be relatively low. This review focuses on the most commonly occurring and important abortifacient pathogens of ruminant species in Europe highlighting their epizootic and zoonotic potential. The performance characteristics of the various diagnostic methods used, including their specific advantages and limitations, are discussed.

Abstract

Abortion in ruminants is a major cause of economic loss worldwide, and the management and control of outbreaks is important in limiting their spread, and in preventing zoonotic infections. Given that rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis is central to controlling abortion outbreaks, the submission of tissue samples to laboratories offering the most appropriate tests is essential. Direct antigen and/or DNA detection methods are the currently preferred methods of reaching an aetiological diagnosis, and ideally these results are confirmed by the demonstration of corresponding macroscopic and/or histopathological lesions in the fetus and/or the placenta. However, the costs of laboratory examinations may be considerable and, even under optimal conditions, the percentage of aetiological diagnoses reached can be relatively low. This review focuses on the most commonly occurring and important abortifacient pathogens of ruminant species in Europe highlighting their epizootic and zoonotic potential. The performance characteristics of the various diagnostic methods used, including their specific advantages and limitations, are discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:20 May 2014 15:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:52
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-0233
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2014.03.015
PubMed ID:24709519

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