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Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience


Morsbach, Fabian; Gordic, Sonja; Desbiolles, Lotus; Husarik, Daniela; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Wildermuth, Simon; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian (2014). Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience. European Radiology, 24(8):1889-1895.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA).
METHODS: First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included.
RESULTS: In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv.
CONCLUSIONS: Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv.
KEY POINTS: • CCTA is feasible with the turbo high-pitch mode. • Turbo high-pitch CCTA provides diagnostic image quality up to 73 bpm. • The radiation dose of high-pitch CCTA is 0.6 mSv on average.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA).
METHODS: First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included.
RESULTS: In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv.
CONCLUSIONS: Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv.
KEY POINTS: • CCTA is feasible with the turbo high-pitch mode. • Turbo high-pitch CCTA provides diagnostic image quality up to 73 bpm. • The radiation dose of high-pitch CCTA is 0.6 mSv on average.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:26 May 2014 15:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0938-7994
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-014-3209-7
PubMed ID:24838737

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