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Mental health and multimorbidity: psychosocial adjustment as an important process for quality of life


Schulze, Thekla; Maercker, Andreas; Horn, Andrea B (2014). Mental health and multimorbidity: psychosocial adjustment as an important process for quality of life. Gerontology, 60(3):249-254.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity (the co-occurrence of two or more chronic diseases) can be seen as a prototypical situation in which psychosocial adjustment is required. Even though most patients adapt successfully, a significant number of individuals show adaptation problems and develop additional mental health problems.
OBJECTIVE: For this reason, this article focuses on the importance of psychosocial adaptation as a core process in the context of quality of life.
RESULTS: Important findings pointing at the association between multimorbidity and mental health are summarized, and the stress-response perspective on psychosocial adjustment is introduced. Furthermore, cognitive-affective processing of the disease (in the context of illness perceptions) and interpersonal emotion regulation are presented as relevant examples for processes involved in psychological adaptation to multimorbidity. As an intervention possibility, expressive writing is given as a feasible example.
CONCLUSION: Viewing adjustment problems to multimorbidity from a stress-response perspective offers a framework for a deeper understanding of core processes regarding multimorbidity and quality of life that is not only important for research but also for clinical practice. This article ends with a general summary and an outlook on clinical implications of the introduced stress-response concept of adjustment to multimorbidity.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity (the co-occurrence of two or more chronic diseases) can be seen as a prototypical situation in which psychosocial adjustment is required. Even though most patients adapt successfully, a significant number of individuals show adaptation problems and develop additional mental health problems.
OBJECTIVE: For this reason, this article focuses on the importance of psychosocial adaptation as a core process in the context of quality of life.
RESULTS: Important findings pointing at the association between multimorbidity and mental health are summarized, and the stress-response perspective on psychosocial adjustment is introduced. Furthermore, cognitive-affective processing of the disease (in the context of illness perceptions) and interpersonal emotion regulation are presented as relevant examples for processes involved in psychological adaptation to multimorbidity. As an intervention possibility, expressive writing is given as a feasible example.
CONCLUSION: Viewing adjustment problems to multimorbidity from a stress-response perspective offers a framework for a deeper understanding of core processes regarding multimorbidity and quality of life that is not only important for research but also for clinical practice. This article ends with a general summary and an outlook on clinical implications of the introduced stress-response concept of adjustment to multimorbidity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychotherapeutisches Zentrum des Psychologischen Instituts UZH
Language:English
Date:April 2014
Deposited On:04 Jun 2014 11:38
Last Modified:27 May 2016 13:57
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0304-324X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000358559
PubMed ID:24603025

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