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Entwicklung der Mortalität in der Schweiz seit 1950: I. Internationaler Vergleich und Unterschiede nach Geschlecht, Alter und Nationalität


Bopp, Matthias; Gutzwiller, Felix (1999). Entwicklung der Mortalität in der Schweiz seit 1950: I. Internationaler Vergleich und Unterschiede nach Geschlecht, Alter und Nationalität. Swiss Medical Weekly, 129(20):760-771.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: All-cause mortality is an important criterion for assessing the health status and the living conditions of a population, thus indicating possible preventive measures.
DATA AND METHODS: Descriptive analyses of Swiss mortality records and a comparison with the WHO mortality data bank for the period since 1950.
RESULTS: Age-specific mortality trends in Switzerland are traced back to 1950 and compared with the situation in other European countries. At the beginning of the 1950s Swiss all-cause mortality rates were about the European average; now they are among the lowest worldwide. In most age classes, rates declined by more than one third between 1951/54 and 1990/94, in females even by more than 50%. This rather optimistic overall picture conceals less favourable partial trends. The decline in mortality rates in men aged 20-49 and women aged 20-34 years did not continue after 1970, and for males aged 20-44 and females aged 25-34 mortality risks have even increased in recent years. In both males and females, mortality rates from injury and poisoning (mainly accidents and suicide) exceed those of European low-incidence countries by 100%. On an international scale Swiss subjects aged between 15 and 44 years are at much higher risk, even when deaths from injury and poisoning, the most important cause of death in these ages, are excluded. When compared with their Swedish contemporaries, Swiss males aged 25-34 years have almost twice the risk of dying from a "natural" as well as from an "external" cause. As a rule, male/female sex ratios of mortality continued to increase, except in subjects aged 45-64 years.
CONCLUSION: In spite of low overall mortality risks, international age-specific rates suggest considerable potential for preventive measures in Switzerland. There is some evidence of substantial under-registration of the mortality risks of foreigners living in Switzerland. As foreigners represent a substantial part of the total population--with a maximum of 30% of men aged 25-34 years--figures for Switzerland as a whole may be biased seriously. Therefore, for mortality analyses and comparisons with international data, we suggest the study be restricted to Swiss citizens. When assessing mortality risks for foreigners in Switzerland alternative data sources and methods should be taken into account.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: All-cause mortality is an important criterion for assessing the health status and the living conditions of a population, thus indicating possible preventive measures.
DATA AND METHODS: Descriptive analyses of Swiss mortality records and a comparison with the WHO mortality data bank for the period since 1950.
RESULTS: Age-specific mortality trends in Switzerland are traced back to 1950 and compared with the situation in other European countries. At the beginning of the 1950s Swiss all-cause mortality rates were about the European average; now they are among the lowest worldwide. In most age classes, rates declined by more than one third between 1951/54 and 1990/94, in females even by more than 50%. This rather optimistic overall picture conceals less favourable partial trends. The decline in mortality rates in men aged 20-49 and women aged 20-34 years did not continue after 1970, and for males aged 20-44 and females aged 25-34 mortality risks have even increased in recent years. In both males and females, mortality rates from injury and poisoning (mainly accidents and suicide) exceed those of European low-incidence countries by 100%. On an international scale Swiss subjects aged between 15 and 44 years are at much higher risk, even when deaths from injury and poisoning, the most important cause of death in these ages, are excluded. When compared with their Swedish contemporaries, Swiss males aged 25-34 years have almost twice the risk of dying from a "natural" as well as from an "external" cause. As a rule, male/female sex ratios of mortality continued to increase, except in subjects aged 45-64 years.
CONCLUSION: In spite of low overall mortality risks, international age-specific rates suggest considerable potential for preventive measures in Switzerland. There is some evidence of substantial under-registration of the mortality risks of foreigners living in Switzerland. As foreigners represent a substantial part of the total population--with a maximum of 30% of men aged 25-34 years--figures for Switzerland as a whole may be biased seriously. Therefore, for mortality analyses and comparisons with international data, we suggest the study be restricted to Swiss citizens. When assessing mortality risks for foreigners in Switzerland alternative data sources and methods should be taken into account.

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Other titles:Development of mortality in Switzerland since 1950. I. International comparison and differences in sex, age and nationality
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:1999
Deposited On:10 Jun 2014 16:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:54
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
PubMed ID:10413810

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