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Health technology assessment in Switzerland


Cranovsky, Richard; Schilling, Julian; Faisst, Karin; Koch, Pedro; Gutzwiller, Felix; Brunner, Hans Heinrich (2000). Health technology assessment in Switzerland. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 16(2):576-590.

Abstract

Switzerland has a mixed public and private healthcare system. All citizens are enrolled in compulsory basic health insurance. A 1996 law allows people to choose among different sickness funds and managed care plans. The federal government is empowered to act on important health issues, but the 26 cantons have prime responsibility in health care and social welfare. They have their own laws on health care, hygiene, hospitals, and social welfare. These laws are not harmonized. The system is complex, with a mix of public (mainly hospitals) and private (mainly doctors' offices) providers. The health services are decentralized. Ambulatory care was traditionally provided in doctors' offices, but the last decade has seen the development of centers for day surgery, group practices, and managed care plans. Decisions on placement, location, and extension of services are decentralized. The payment system is very complex. Current trends include global budgets, cost analyses, and prices related to patient categories. However, coverage policy is developed centrally and includes both traditionally established services and new technologies. New technologies are added to the list only after evaluation by the Federal Coverage Committee. The coverage process integrates health technology assessment (HTA). Coverage can be granted in stages, including limited coverage and temporary coverage. Technologies and coverage can be reevaluated on the basis of registries or assessment information. The structure of the Swiss healthcare system does not lend itself to the establishment of a national HTA program. However, recent moves include the development of a coordinating mechanism for HTA in Switzerland.

Abstract

Switzerland has a mixed public and private healthcare system. All citizens are enrolled in compulsory basic health insurance. A 1996 law allows people to choose among different sickness funds and managed care plans. The federal government is empowered to act on important health issues, but the 26 cantons have prime responsibility in health care and social welfare. They have their own laws on health care, hygiene, hospitals, and social welfare. These laws are not harmonized. The system is complex, with a mix of public (mainly hospitals) and private (mainly doctors' offices) providers. The health services are decentralized. Ambulatory care was traditionally provided in doctors' offices, but the last decade has seen the development of centers for day surgery, group practices, and managed care plans. Decisions on placement, location, and extension of services are decentralized. The payment system is very complex. Current trends include global budgets, cost analyses, and prices related to patient categories. However, coverage policy is developed centrally and includes both traditionally established services and new technologies. New technologies are added to the list only after evaluation by the Federal Coverage Committee. The coverage process integrates health technology assessment (HTA). Coverage can be granted in stages, including limited coverage and temporary coverage. Technologies and coverage can be reevaluated on the basis of registries or assessment information. The structure of the Swiss healthcare system does not lend itself to the establishment of a national HTA program. However, recent moves include the development of a coordinating mechanism for HTA in Switzerland.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2000
Deposited On:17 Jun 2014 15:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:55
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0266-4623
PubMed ID:10932425

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